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Skeletal Radiology

, Volume 35, Issue 7, pp 497–502 | Cite as

Nora’s lesion, a distinct radiological entity?

  • E. Dhondt
  • L. Oudenhoven
  • S. Khan
  • H. M. Kroon
  • P. C. Hogendoorn(•)
  • A. Nieborg
  • J. L. Bloem
  • A. De Schepper
Scientific Article

Abstract

Objective

To describe the radiological findings of “Bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation”(BPOP)—otherwise known as Nora’s lesion, to describe the natural evolution of BPOP and to assess radiologically if BPOP is indeed part of a spectrum of reactive lesions including florid reactive periostitis and turret exostosis.

Design

Four experienced musculoskeletal radiologists studied plain radiographs and other imaging documents of histologically-proven Nora’s lesions, looking for soft-tissue changes, periosteal reaction/calcification and calcified/ossified pseudotumours, and compared those findings with findings on pathology reviewed by a peer group of pathologists.

Patients

Twenty-four Nora’s lesions originating from a series of 200 consecutive, histologically-verified bone (pseudo)tumours of the hand, seen by the “Netherlands Committee on Bone Tumours” for review and second opinion.

Results

Nora’s lesions have a recognised presentation on radiographs without specific MR characteristics. Natural evolution could be assessed retrospectively in four cases. Recurrent lesions were seen in seven cases and are difficult to differentiate from primary lesions.

Conclusions

Nora’s lesion, defined as a “well-marginated mass of heterotopic mineralization arising from the periosteal aspect of an intact cortex, without medullary changes” has a distinct radiological presentation and is part of a spectrum of reactive lesions which includes florid reactive periostitis and turret exostosis. As it has a distinct radiological appearance, differential diagnosis of malignant lesions such as osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma should be clear. It does not require immediate biopsy unless the natural evolution is unspecific.

Keywords

Florid reactive periostitis Bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation Nora’s lesion Turret exostosis 

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Copyright information

© ISS 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Dhondt
    • 1
  • L. Oudenhoven
    • 1
  • S. Khan
    • 1
  • H. M. Kroon
    • 1
  • P. C. Hogendoorn(•)
    • 1
  • A. Nieborg
    • 1
  • J. L. Bloem
    • 1
  • A. De Schepper
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiology and Pathology(•)Leiden University Medical CenterRC LeidenThe Netherlands

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