Environmental Geology

, Volume 49, Issue 2, pp 321–331 | Cite as

Contamination of tsunami sediments in a coastal zone inundated by the 26 December 2004 tsunami in Thailand

  • Witold Szczuciński
  • Przemysław Niedzielski
  • Grzegorz Rachlewicz
  • Tadeusz Sobczyński
  • Anetta Zioła
  • Artur Kowalski
  • Stanisław Lorenc
  • Jerzy Siepak
Original Article

Abstract

Tsunami sediments deposited in a coastal zone of Thailand by the 26 December 2004 tsunami wave were sampled within 50 days after the event. All surface and ground waters in tsunami- inundated zone revealed significant salinity at that time. The tsunami sediments, composed mainly of fine to medium sand, contain significantly elevated contents of salts (Na+, K+, Ca+2, Mg+2, Cl and SO4−2) in water-soluble fraction, and of Cd, Cu, Zn, Pb in the bioavailable fraction and As in the exchangeable fraction in relation to the reference sample. The origin of contaminants is marine, as well as litho- and anthropogenic. The salts and Pb, Zn and Cu reveal high correlation to each other and to the mean grain size (pore size and porosity). Serious environmental hazard exists in that region because, due to gentle morphology, there is a risk of migration of the contaminants into ground waters and food chain.

Keywords

Contamination Tsunami sediments Thailand 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Witold Szczuciński
    • 1
  • Przemysław Niedzielski
    • 2
  • Grzegorz Rachlewicz
    • 3
  • Tadeusz Sobczyński
    • 2
  • Anetta Zioła
    • 4
  • Artur Kowalski
    • 2
  • Stanisław Lorenc
    • 1
  • Jerzy Siepak
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of GeologyA. Mickiewicz UniversityPoznańPoland
  2. 2.Department of Water and Soil AnalysisA. Mickiewicz UniversityPoznańPoland
  3. 3.Institute of Paleogeography and GeoecologyA. Mickiewicz UniversityPoznańPoland
  4. 4.Collegium PolonicumA. Mickiewicz UniversitySłubicePoland

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