Environmental Geology

, Volume 46, Issue 6–7, pp 750–754 | Cite as

Evaluation of lead movement from the abiotic to biotic at a small-arms firing range

  • Michael P. Labare
  • Michael A. Butkus
  • Dawn Riegner
  • Nick Schommer
  • Jason Atkinson
Original Article

Abstract

An investigation to characterize the extent and speciation of lead contamination in water, soil, and surrounding biota was conducted at a small-arms firing and skeet range in West Point, New York. Specifically, lead concentrations were examined in sediment, soil, water, plants, fish and invertebrates. There is an elevated concentration of lead in the soil and sediment up to 11,000 μg/g and 340 μg/g and also evidence of bioconcentration of the lead by the surrounding biota. Earthworms had up to 90% higher concentrations of lead while tadpoles showed 20% higher concentrations compared with their controls. Lead uptake by indigenous plants gave varying results. Two species bioconcentrated lead 20 and 55 times greater than the control plants. These differences were significant (P <0.05 level) when tested by the student’s t test. Further studies show that the total leachable lead was highest in the invertebrates and vertebrates but not in the plants.

Keywords

Lead Firing ranges Plant bioconcentration Bioavailability 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael P. Labare
    • 1
  • Michael A. Butkus
    • 2
  • Dawn Riegner
    • 1
  • Nick Schommer
    • 1
  • Jason Atkinson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry and Life SciencesU.S. Military AcademyWest PointUSA
  2. 2.Environmental Engineering Program, Department of Geography and Environmental EngineeringU.S. Military AcademyWest PointUSA

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