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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 56, Issue 5–6, pp 567–576 | Cite as

The use of micro-organisms for L-ascorbic acid production: current status and future perspectives

  •  R. Hancock
  •  R. Viola
Mini-Review

Abstract.

L-Ascorbic acid (L-AA) has been industrially produced for around 60 years in a primarily chemical process utilising D-glucose (D-glc) as starting material. Current world production is estimated at approximately 80,000 tonnes per annum with a worldwide market in excess of U.S. $600 million. We present a brief overview of research geared to exploiting micro-organisms for the industrial production of vitamin C, with emphasis on recent approaches using genetically engineered bacterial strains. We also discuss the potential for direct production of L-AA exploiting novel biochemical pathways with particular reference to yeast fermentations. The potential advantages of these novel approaches over current chemical and biotechnological processes are outlined.

Keywords

Fermentation Bacterial Strain Chemical Process Acid Production Industrial Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  •  R. Hancock
    • 1
  •  R. Viola
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Unit of Plant Biochemistry, Scottish Crop Research Institute, Invergowrie, Dundee DD2 5DA, UK

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