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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 103, Issue 1, pp 427–435 | Cite as

Development and application of a colloidal gold test strip for detection of avian leukosis virus

  • Mengmeng Yu
  • Yuanling Bao
  • Muping Wang
  • Haibo Zhu
  • Xiaoyan Wang
  • Lixiao Xing
  • Fangfang Chang
  • Yongzhen Liu
  • Muhammad Farooque
  • Yongqiang Wang
  • Xiaole Qi
  • Changjun Liu
  • Yanping Zhang
  • Hongyu Cui
  • Kai Li
  • Li Gao
  • Qing Pan
  • Xiaomei WangEmail author
  • Yulong GaoEmail author
Methods and protocols
  • 297 Downloads

Abstract

Avian leukosis virus (ALV) is an avian oncogenic retrovirus that induces leukemia-like proliferative diseases in chickens. ALV infection can result in the development of immunological tolerance and persistent viremia. Since effective vaccines against ALV are not yet available, its current prevention primarily depends on detection and eradication to establish exogenous ALV-free poultry flocks. In this study, a rapid and simple colloidal gold test strip method, specific for the group-specific antigen, p27 protein, was developed and systematically evaluated for the detection of ALV from different samples. The detection limit of this assay was as low as 6.25 ng/ml for p27 protein and 80 TCID50/ml for different subgroups of ALV. Besides, the test strip showed high specificity in the detection of different subgroups of ALV, including ALV-A, ALV-B, ALV-J, and ALV-K, with no cross-reaction with other avian pathogens. Furthermore, we artificially infected specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens with ALV-J, collected cloacal swabs, and examined viral shedding using both test strips and ELISA. Results from the test strip were highly consistent with that from ELISA. In addition, 1104 virus isolates from anti-coagulant blood samples, 645 albumen samples, and 4312 meconium samples were tested, and the test strip results agreed with those of ELISA kit up to 97.1%. All the results indicated that the colloidal gold test strip could serve as a simple, rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnostic method for eradication of ALV in poultry farms.

Keywords

Avian leukosis virus Colloidal gold strip test Eradication ELISA Meconium 

Notes

Funding information

This study was supported by the National Key Research & Development (R&D) Plan (2016YFD0501605) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31761133002).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Ethics statement

All animal studies with chicken were approved by the Review Board of Harbin Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences. All animal procedures were performed according to international standards on animal welfare.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mengmeng Yu
    • 1
  • Yuanling Bao
    • 1
  • Muping Wang
    • 2
  • Haibo Zhu
    • 2
  • Xiaoyan Wang
    • 3
  • Lixiao Xing
    • 1
  • Fangfang Chang
    • 1
  • Yongzhen Liu
    • 1
  • Muhammad Farooque
    • 1
  • Yongqiang Wang
    • 1
  • Xiaole Qi
    • 1
  • Changjun Liu
    • 1
  • Yanping Zhang
    • 1
  • Hongyu Cui
    • 1
  • Kai Li
    • 1
  • Li Gao
    • 1
  • Qing Pan
    • 1
  • Xiaomei Wang
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yulong Gao
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Division of Avian Infectious Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Harbin Veterinary Research InstituteThe Chinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesHarbinPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Harbin Guosheng Biotechnology Co., LtdHarbinPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Chinese Academy of Sciences Key Laboratory of infection and immunityInstitute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of sciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China

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