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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 102, Issue 15, pp 6567–6579 | Cite as

Comparative study of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis genes expressed within avian and murine macrophages via selective capture of transcribed sequences (SCOTS)

  • Qiuchun Li
  • Yu Yuan
  • Xin Wang
  • Jing Chen
  • Yingfei Wu
  • Xiaochun Wang
  • Lijuan Xu
  • Keqian Yin
  • Zijian Liu
  • Chao Yin
  • Yue Zhu
  • Yang Li
  • Jingwei Ren
  • Xinan Jiao
Applied genetics and molecular biotechnology
  • 54 Downloads

Abstract

Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) is a communicable zoonotic bacterium. Macrophages are essential for Salmonella survival, transmission, and infection. In this study, selective capture of transcribed sequences (SCOTS) was used to screen genes preferentially expressed by SE during contact with macrophages from different hosts. We found 57 predicted genes and 52 genes expressed by SE during interaction with avian HD-11 and murine RAW264.7 cells, respectively. These expressed genes were involved in virulence, metabolism, stress response, transport, regulation, and other functions. Although genes related to survival or metabolic pathways were needed during SE infection, different gene expression profiles of SE occurred in the two macrophage cell lines. qRT-PCR results confirmed that most screened genes were upregulated during infection in contrast to the observation during in vitro cultivation, with different expression levels in infected avian macrophages at 2-h and 7-h post-infection. In addition, in vitro and in vivo competition assays confirmed that SEN3610 (a putative deoR family regulator) and rfaQ (related to LPS synthesis) were closely related to SE virulence in both mice and chickens. Three putative transcriptional regulators, SEN2967, SEN4299, and rtcR, were related to SE colonization in mice, while the ycaM mutation caused decreased infection and survival of SE in HD-11 cells without influencing virulence in mice or chicken. Genes showing differential expression between SE-infected avian and murine macrophages indicate specific pathogen adaptation to enable infection of various hosts.

Keywords

Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) Macrophage HD-11 RAW264.7 Gene expression profile 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank all of the staffs for their helpful suggestions and work during this project. We would like to thank the editor for the helpful comments on the manuscript.

Author contributions

Qiuchun Li and Yu Yuan contributed equally to this article.

Funding information

This work was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31320103907, 31730094), the Special Fund for Agro-scientific Research in the Public Interest (201403054), the National Key Research and Development Program of China (2017YFD0500705,2017YFD0500105); the Jiangsu Province Agricultural Science and Technology Independent Innovation Funds (CX(16)1028), and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All animal experiments were approved by the Jiangsu Administrative Committee for Laboratory Animals (Approval No. SYXK 2016-0020) and conducted in accordance with the guidelines approved by Yangzhou University’s Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors.

Supplementary material

253_2018_9067_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (545 kb)
ESM 1 (PDF 545 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qiuchun Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yu Yuan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xin Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jing Chen
    • 2
  • Yingfei Wu
    • 2
  • Xiaochun Wang
    • 2
  • Lijuan Xu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Keqian Yin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zijian Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chao Yin
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yue Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yang Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jingwei Ren
    • 2
    • 3
  • Xinan Jiao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Prevention and Control of Biological Hazard Factors (Animal Origin) for Agri-food Safety and Quality, Ministry of Agriculture of ChinaYangzhou UniversityYangzhouChina
  2. 2.Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Zoonosis/Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and ZoonosesYangzhou UniversityYangzhouChina
  3. 3.Joint International Research Laboratory of Agriculture and Agri-Product SafetyYangzhou UniversityYangzhouChina

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