Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 98, Issue 16, pp 6983–6989

Filamentous fungi in microtiter plates—an easy way to optimize itaconic acid production with Aspergillus terreus

Biotechnological products and process engineering
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Abstract

Itaconic acid is an important industrial building block and is produced by the filamentous fungi Aspergillus terreus. To make the optimization process more efficient, a scale-down from shake flasks to microtiter plates was performed. This resulted in comparable product formations, and 87.7 g/L itaconic acid was formed after 10 days of cultivation in the microtiter plate. The components of the minimal medium were varied independently for a media optimization. This resulted in an increase of the itaconic acid concentration by a variation of the KH2PO4 and CuSO4 concentrations. The cultivation with a higher KH2PO4 concentration in a 400-mL bioreactor showed an increase in the maximum productivity of 1.88 g/L/h, which was an increase of 74 % in comparison to the reference. Neither the phosphate concentration nor the nitrogen sources were limited at the start of the product formation. This showed that a limitation of these substances is not necessary for the itaconic acid formation.

Keywords

Aspergillus terreus Itaconic acid Cultivation Microtiter plate Optimization 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antje Hevekerl
    • 1
  • Anja Kuenz
    • 1
  • Klaus-Dieter Vorlop
    • 1
  1. 1.Thünen-Institute of Agricultural TechnologyBraunschweigGermany

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