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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 98, Issue 15, pp 6847–6858 | Cite as

Characterization and application of bioflocculant prepared by Rhodococcus erythropolis using sludge and livestock wastewater as cheap culture media

  • Lanyan Peng
  • Chunping Yang
  • Guangming Zeng
  • Lu Wang
  • Chuanhua Dai
  • Zhiyong Long
  • Hongyu Liu
  • Yuanyuan Zhong
Environmental biotechnology

Abstract

A new bioflocculant was produced by culturing Rhodococcus erythropolis in a cheap medium. When culture pH was 7.0, inoculum size was 2 % (v/v), Na2HPO4 concentration was 0.5 g L−1, and the ratio of sludge/livestock wastewater was 7:1 (v/v), a maximum flocculating rate of 87.6 % could be achieved. Among 13 different kinds of pretreatments for sludge, the optimal one was the thermal-alkaline pretreatment. Different from a bioflocculant produced in a standard medium, this bioflocculant was effective over a wide pH range from 2 to 12 with flocculating rates higher than 98 %. Approximately, 1.6 g L−1 of crude bioflocculant could be harvested using cold ethanol for extraction. This bioflocculant showed color removal rates up to 80 % when applied to direct and disperse dye solutions, but only 23.0 % for reactive dye solutions. Infrared spectrum showed that the bioflocculant contained functional groups such as –OH, –NH2, and –CONH2. Components in the bioflocculant consisted of 91.2 % of polysaccharides, 7.6 % of proteins, and 1.2 % of DNA. When the bioflocculant and copper sulfate (CuSO4) were used together for decolorization in actual dye wastewater, the optimum decolorization conditions were specified by the response surface methodology as pH 11, bioflocculant dosage of 40 mg/L, and CuSO4 80 mg/L, under which a decolorization rate of 93.9 % could be reached.

Keywords

Pretreatment Bioflocculant Polysaccharides Excess sludge Rhodococcus erythropolis Response surface methodology 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Financial support from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51278464) and the Hunan Haishang Environmental Biotechnology Co, Ltd. is highly appreciated.

Supplementary material

253_2014_5725_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (163 kb)
ESM 1 (PDF 163 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lanyan Peng
    • 1
    • 3
  • Chunping Yang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Guangming Zeng
    • 1
    • 3
  • Lu Wang
    • 1
    • 3
  • Chuanhua Dai
    • 1
    • 3
  • Zhiyong Long
    • 1
    • 3
  • Hongyu Liu
    • 1
    • 3
  • Yuanyuan Zhong
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.College of Environmental Science and EngineeringHunan UniversityChangshaChina
  2. 2.Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Solid Waste Treatment and Recycling, College of Environmental Science and EngineeringZhejiang Gongshang UniversityHangzhouChina
  3. 3.Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University)Ministry of EducationChangshaChina

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