Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 98, Issue 12, pp 5449–5460

Process characterization and influence of alternative carbon sources and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio on organic acid production by Aspergillus oryzae DSM1863

  • Katrin Ochsenreither
  • Christian Fischer
  • Anke Neumann
  • Christoph Syldatk
Biotechnological products and process engineering

DOI: 10.1007/s00253-014-5614-x

Cite this article as:
Ochsenreither, K., Fischer, C., Neumann, A. et al. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol (2014) 98: 5449. doi:10.1007/s00253-014-5614-x

Abstract

l-Malic acid and fumaric acid are C4 dicarboxylic organic acids and considered as promising chemical building blocks. They can be applied as food preservatives and acidulants in rust removal and as polymerization starter units. Molds of the genus Aspergillus are able to produce malic acid in large quantities from glucose and other carbon sources. In order to enhance the production potential of Aspergillus oryzae DSM 1863, production and consumption rates in an established bioreactor batch-process based on glucose were determined. At 35 °C, up to 42 g/L malic acid was produced in a 168-h batch process with fumaric acid as a by-product. In prolonged shaking flask experiments (353 h), the suitability of the alternative carbon sources xylose and glycerol at a carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratio of 200:1 and the influence of different C/N ratios in glucose cultivations were tested. When using glucose, 58.2 g/L malic acid and 4.2 g/L fumaric acid were produced. When applying xylose or glycerol, both organic acids are produced but the formation of malic acid decreased to 45.4 and 39.4 g/L, respectively. Whereas the fumaric acid concentration was not significantly altered when cultivating with xylose (4.5 g/L), it is clearly enhanced by using glycerol (9.3 g/L). When using glucose as a carbon source, an increase or decrease of the C/N ratio did not influence malic acid production but had an enormous influence on fumaric acid production. The highest fumaric acid concentrations were determined at the highest C/N ratio (300:1, 8.44 g/L) and lowest at the lowest C/N ratio (100:1, 0.7 g/L).

Keywords

Malic acid Fumaric acid Aspergillus oryzae Process characterization C/N ratio Alternative carbon sources 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katrin Ochsenreither
    • 1
  • Christian Fischer
    • 1
  • Anke Neumann
    • 1
  • Christoph Syldatk
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Process Engineering in Life Sciences, Section II: Technical BiologyKarlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)KarlsruheGermany

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