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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 97, Issue 6, pp 2367–2378 | Cite as

Immunological features and efficacy of the reconstructed epitope vaccine CtUBE against Helicobacter pylori infection in BALB/c mice model

  • Le Guo
  • Kunmei Liu
  • Wenfeng Zhao
  • Xiaokang Li
  • Tong Li
  • Feng Tang
  • Rui Zhang
  • Wutong Wu
  • Tao XiEmail author
Biotechnological products and process engineering

Abstract

Urease is an essential virulence factor and colonization factor for Helicobacter pylori, of which the urease B subunit (UreB) is considered as an excellent vaccine candidate antigen. In previous study, an epitope vaccine with cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and an epitope (UreB321–339) named CtUBE was constructed and the mice were protected significantly after intragastric vaccination with the CtUBE liposome vaccine. However, the fusion protein CtUBE was expressed as inclusion bodies and was difficultly purified. Besides, the immunogenicity and specificity of the CtUBE vaccine was not investigated in a fairly wide and detailed way. In this study, the fusion peptide CtUBE was reconstructed and expressed as a soluble protein with pectinase signal peptide at the N terminus and the 6-his tag at its C-terminal, and then the immunogenicity, specificity, prophylactic, and therapeutic efficacy of the reconstructed CtUBE (rCtUBE) vaccine were evaluated in BALB/c mice model after purification. The experimental results indicated that mice immunized with rCtUBE could produce comparatively high level of specific antibodies which could respond to natural H. pylori urease, UreB, or the minimal epitope UreB327–334 involved with the active site of urease, and showed effectively inhibitory effect on the enzymatic activity of urease. Besides, oral prophylactic or therapeutic immunization with rCtUBE significantly decreased H. pylori colonization compared with oral immunization with rCTB or PBS, and the protection was correlated with antigen-specific IgG, IgA, and mucosal sIgA antibody responses, and a Th2 cells response. This rCtUBE vaccine may be a promising vaccine candidate for the control of H. pylori infection.

Keywords

Helicobacter pylori Epitope vaccine Cholera toxin B subunit Urease B subunit Neutralizing antibody 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Science Foundation of China Pharmaceutical University (grant no, JKY2009023), Postgraduate Innovation Project of Jiangsu Province (grant no, CXZZ11_0817), and National Major Special Program of New Drug Research and Development (grant no, 2012ZX09103-301-008). We especially thank Professor Wutong Wu for his contributions in implementation of this experiment. Meanwhile, B.S Catherine J Tsang is thanked for the careful revision of this paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Le Guo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kunmei Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wenfeng Zhao
    • 2
  • Xiaokang Li
    • 2
  • Tong Li
    • 2
  • Feng Tang
    • 2
  • Rui Zhang
    • 2
  • Wutong Wu
    • 2
  • Tao Xi
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.School of Laboratory MedicineNingxia Medical UniversityYinchuanChina
  2. 2.Biotechnology Center, School of Life Science and TechnologyChina Pharmaceutical UniversityNanjingChina

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