Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 90, Issue 1, pp 343–352

Cunninghamella elegans biomass optimisation for textile wastewater biosorption treatment: an analytical and ecotoxicological approach

  • Valeria Tigini
  • Valeria Prigione
  • Ilaria Donelli
  • Antonella Anastasi
  • Giuliano Freddi
  • Pietro Giansanti
  • Antonella Mangiavillano
  • Giovanna Cristina Varese
Environmental Biotechnology

Abstract

The effect of pre-treatments on the composition of Cunninghamella elegans biomass and on its biosorption yields in the treatment of simulated textile wastewaters was investigated. The inactivated biomass was subjected to physical treatments, such as oven drying and lyophilisation, and chemical treatments using acid or alkali. The wastewater colour, COD and toxicity variations were evaluated. The lyophilisation sped up the biosorption process, whereas the chemical pre-treatment changed the affinity of biomass for different dyes. The alkali per-treated biomass achieved the highest COD reduction in the treatment of alkali wastewaters, probably because no release of alkali-soluble biomass components occurred under the alkaline pH conditions. Accordingly, only the acid pre-treated biomass decreased the COD of the acidic effluent. The ecotoxicity test showed significant toxicity reduction after biosorption treatments, indicating that decolourisation corresponds to an actual detoxification of the treated wastewaters. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analyses of biomasses allowed highlighting their main chemical and physical properties and the changes induced by the different pre-treatments, as well as the effect of the chemical species adsorbed from wastewaters.

Keywords

Biosorption Wastewaters Remediation Fungi Biomass characterisation 

References

  1. Aksu Z (2005) Application of biosorption for the removal of organic pollutants: a review. Process Biochem 40:997–1026CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Aksu Z, Çağatay SS (2006) Investigation of biosorption of Gemazol Turquoise Blue-G reactive dye by dried Rhizopus arrhizus in batch and continuous systems. Sep Purif Technol 48:24–35CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Anastasi A, Prigione V, Casieri L, Varese GC (2009) Decolourisation of model and industrial dyes by mitosporic fungi in different culture conditions. World J Microbiol Biotechnol 8:1363–1374CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Aspland JR (1993) A series on dyeing. 10. The application of ionic dyes to ionic fibers—nylon, silk and wool and their sorption of anions. Text Chem Color 25:22–26Google Scholar
  5. Banat IM, Nigam P, Singh D, Marchant R (1996) Microbial decolorization of textile-dye-containing effluents: a review. Bioresour Technol 58:217–227CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bayramoglu G, Celik G, Arica MY (2006) Biosorption of reactive blue 4 dye by native and treated fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium: batch and continuous flow system studies. J Hazard Mater 137:1689–1697CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Blackburn R (2004) Natural polysaccharides and their interactions with dye molecules: application in effluent treatment. Environ Sci Technol 38:4905–4909CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Casieri L, Prigione V, Anastasi A, Tigini V, Varese GC (2008) Metabolism-independent biosorption of industrial dyes by fungal biomasses revealed by batch sorption experiments and confocal microscopy. Special issue on conventional and non-conventional adsorbents for dye removal from aqueous solutions. Int J Chem Eng 1:273–287Google Scholar
  9. Crini G (2006) Non-conventional low-cost adsorbents for dye removal: a review. Bioresour Technol 97:1061–1085CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Das SK, Ghosh P, Ghosh I, Guha AK (2008) Adsorption of rhodamine B on Rhizopus oryzae: role of functional group and cell wall components. Colloid Surf B 65:30–34CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Fu Y, Viraraghavan T (2002) Dye biosorption sites in Aspergillus niger. Bioresour Technol 82:139–145CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Gadd MG (1993) Interaction of fungi with toxic metals. New Phytol 124:25–60CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Gadd MG (2009) Biosorption: critical review of scientific rationale, environmental importance and significance for pollution treatment. J Chem Technol Biotechnol 84:13–28CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Gallagher KA, Healy MG, Allen SJ (1997) Biosorption of synthetic dye and metal ions from aqueous effluents using fungal biomass. In: Wise DL (ed) Global environmental biotechnology. Elsevier, UK, pp 27–50Google Scholar
  15. Kaushik P, Malik A (2009) Fungal dye decolourization: recent advances and future potential. Environ Int 35:127–141CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Keenan PO, Knight AW, Billinton N, Cahill PA, Dalrymple IM, Hawkyard CJ, Stratton-Campbell D, Walmsley RM (2007) Clear and present danger? The use of a yeast biosensor to monitor changes in the toxicity of industrial effluents subjected to oxidative colour removal treatments. J Environ Monit 9:1394–1401CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Khalaf MA (2008) Biosorption of reactive dye from textile wastewater by non-viable biomass of Aspergillus niger and Spirogyra sp. Bioresour Technol 99:6631–6634CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Liu Y, Liu YJ (2008) Biosorption isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamics. Sep Purif Technol 61:229–242CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Pearce CI, Lloyd JR, Guthrie JT (2003) The removal of colour from textile wastewater using whole bacterial cells: a review. Dyes Pigm 58:179–196CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Polman JK, Breckenridge CR (1996) Biomass-mediated binding and recovery of textile dyes from waste effluents. Text Chem Color 28:31–35Google Scholar
  21. Prigione V, Tigini V, Pezzella C, Anastasi A, Sannia G, Varese GC (2008a) Decolourisation and detoxification of textile effluents by fungal biosorption. Water Res 42:2911–2920CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Prigione V, Varese GC, Casieri L, Filipello Marchisio V (2008b) Biosorption of simulated dyed effluents by inactivated fungal biomasses. Bioresour Technol 99:3559–3567CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Punjongharn P, Meevasana K, Pavasant P (2008) Influence of particle size and salinity on adsorption of basic dyes by agricultural waste: dried seagrape (Caulerpa lentillifera). J Environ Sci China 20:760–768Google Scholar
  24. Ruiz-Herrera J (1992) Fungal cell wall: structure, synthesis, and assembly. CRC, LondonGoogle Scholar
  25. Sharma KP, Sharma S, Sharma S, Singh PK, Kumar S, Grover R, Sharma PKA (2007) comparative study on characterization of textile wastewaters (untreated and treated) toxicity by chemical and biological tests. Chemosphere 69:48–54CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Tigini (2010) Fungal biosorption in wastewater treatment: decolourisation and detoxification of textile and tannery effluents. Ph.D. thesis in Biology and Biotechnology of Fungi, University of TurinGoogle Scholar
  27. Vijayaraghavan K, Lee MW, Yun YS (2008) A new approach to study the decolorization of complex reactive dye bath effluent by biosorption technique. Bioresour Technol 99:5778–5785CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Valeria Tigini
    • 1
  • Valeria Prigione
    • 1
  • Ilaria Donelli
    • 2
  • Antonella Anastasi
    • 1
  • Giuliano Freddi
    • 2
  • Pietro Giansanti
    • 3
  • Antonella Mangiavillano
    • 3
  • Giovanna Cristina Varese
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant BiologyUniversity of TurinTurinItaly
  2. 2.Stazione Sperimentale per la SetaMilanItaly
  3. 3.Arpa Piemonte, Dipartimento di Torino, Laboratorio di Ecotossicologia e MutagenesiGrugliascoItaly

Personalised recommendations