Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 89, Issue 3, pp 733–738 | Cite as

The impact of MIG1 and/or MIG2 disruption on aerobic metabolism of succinate dehydrogenase negative Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  • Hailong Cao
  • Min Yue
  • Shuguang Li
  • Xuefang Bai
  • Xiaoming Zhao
  • Yuguang Du
Applied Genetics and Molecular Biotechnology

Abstract

The zinc finger proteins Mig1 and Mig2 play important roles in glucose repression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To investigate whether the alleviation of glucose effect would result in an increase in aerobic succinate production, MIG1 and/or MIG2 were disrupted in a succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-negative S. cerevisiae strain. Moreover, their impacts on physiology of the SDH-negative S. cerevisiae strain were studied under fully aerobic conditions when glucose was the sole carbon source. Our results showed that the succinate production for the SDH-negative S. cerevisiae was very low even under fully aerobic conditions. Furthermore, deletion of MIG1 and/or MIG2 did not result in an increase in succinate production in the SDH-negative S. cerevisiae strain. However, the synthesis of acetate was significantly affected by MIG1 deletion or in combination with MIG2 deletion. The acetate production for the mig1/mig2 double mutant BS2M was reduced by 69.72% compared to the parent strain B2S. In addition, the amount of ethanol produced by BS2M was slightly decreased. With the mig2 mutant BSM2, the concentrations of pyruvate and glycerol were increased by 26.23% and 15.28%, respectively, compared to the parent strain B2S.

Keywords

Saccharomyces cerevisiae Succinate dehydrogenase MIG1 MIG2 Aerobic metabolism Glucose repression 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was financially supported by Hi-Tech Research and Development Program of China (Nos. 2006AA10A213 and 2007AA091601), and the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Nos. KSCX2-YW-N-007 and KSCX2-YW-G-012). We thank Dr. Xiangfei Kong and James Robert for revising the writing of our manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hailong Cao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Min Yue
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shuguang Li
    • 1
  • Xuefang Bai
    • 1
  • Xiaoming Zhao
    • 1
  • Yuguang Du
    • 1
  1. 1.Dalian Institute of Chemical PhysicsChinese Academy of SciencesDalianPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China

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