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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 88, Issue 2, pp 553–562 | Cite as

Bacterial diversities on unaged and aging flue-cured tobacco leaves estimated by 16S rRNA sequence analysis

  • Jingwen Huang
  • Jinkui Yang
  • Yanqing Duan
  • Wen Gu
  • Xiaowei Gong
  • Wei Zhe
  • Can Su
  • Ke-Qin Zhang
Applied Microbial and Cell Physiology

Abstract

Flue-cured tobacco leaves (FCTL) contain abundant bacteria, and these bacteria play very important roles in the tobacco aging process. However, bacterial communities on aging FCTL are not fully understood. In this study, the total microbial genome DNA of unaged and aging flue-cured tobacco K326 were isolated using a culture-independent method, and the bacterial communities were investigated by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Comparison of the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the cloned libraries from the unaged and aging FCTL showed that the microbial communities between the two groups were different. Fifty and 42 OTUs were obtained from 300 positive clones in unaged and aging FCTL, respectively. Twenty-seven species of bacteria exist in both the unaged and aging FCTL, Bacillus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. were two dominant genera in FCTL. However, 23 bacterial species were only identified from the unaged FCTL, while 15 species were only identified from the aging FCTL. Interestingly, more uncultured bacteria species were found in aging FCTL than in unaged FCTL.

Keywords

Flue-cured tobacco leaves (FCTL) Bacterial diversity 16S rRNA gene library RFLP analysis Phylogenetic analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are grateful to Prof. Jianping Xu of the Dept. Biology, McMaster University, for valuable comments and critical discussions. This work was supported by projects from the Department of Science and Technology of Yunnan Province (approved nos. 2006GG22 and 2009CI052).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jingwen Huang
    • 1
  • Jinkui Yang
    • 1
  • Yanqing Duan
    • 2
  • Wen Gu
    • 1
  • Xiaowei Gong
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wei Zhe
    • 2
  • Can Su
    • 1
  • Ke-Qin Zhang
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-Resources, and Key Laboratory for Microbial Resources of the Ministry of EducationYunnan UniversityKunmingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Technology Centre of Hongyun Honghe Tobacco (Group) Co, LtdKunmingPeople’s Republic of China

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