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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 81, Issue 3, pp 459–464 | Cite as

An efficient succinic acid production process in a metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum strain

  • Shohei Okino
  • Ryoji Noburyu
  • Masako Suda
  • Toru Jojima
  • Masayuki Inui
  • Hideaki YukawaEmail author
Biotechnological Products and Process Engineering

Abstract

A Corynebacterium glutamicum strain (ΔldhA-pCRA717) that overexpresses the pyc gene encoding pyruvate carboxylase while simultaneously exhibiting a disrupted ldhA gene encoding l-lactate dehydrogenase was investigated in detail for succinic acid production. Succinic acid was shown to be efficiently produced at high-cell density under oxygen deprivation with intermittent addition of sodium bicarbonate and glucose. Succinic acid concentration reached 1.24 M (146 g l−1) within 46 h. The yields of succinic acid and acetic acid from glucose were 1.40 mol mol−1 (0.92 g g−1) and 0.29 mol mol−1 (0.10 g g−1), respectively. The succinic acid production rate and yield depended on medium bicarbonate concentration rather than glucose concentration. Consumption of bicarbonate accompanied with succinic acid production implied that added bicarbonate was used for succinic acid synthesis.

Keywords

Succinic acid Corynebacterium glutamicum Pyruvate carboxylase 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shohei Okino
    • 1
  • Ryoji Noburyu
    • 1
  • Masako Suda
    • 1
  • Toru Jojima
    • 1
  • Masayuki Inui
    • 1
  • Hideaki Yukawa
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Research Institute of Innovative Technology for the EarthKyotoJapan

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