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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 75, Issue 3, pp 589–597 | Cite as

Large scale deletions in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome create strains with altered regulation of carbon metabolism

  • Kiriko Murakami
  • Eriko Tao
  • Yuki Ito
  • Minetaka Sugiyama
  • Yoshinobu Kaneko
  • Satoshi Harashima
  • Takahiro Sumiya
  • Atsushi Nakamura
  • Masafumi NishizawaEmail author
Applied Genetics and Molecular Biotechnology

Abstract

Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for centuries the yeast that has been the workhorse for the fermentative production of ethanol, is now also a model system for biological research. The recent development of chromosome-splitting techniques has enabled the manipulation of the yeast genome on a large scale, and this has allowed us to explore questions with both biological and industrial relevance, the number of genes required for growth and the genome organization responsible for the ethanol production. To approach these questions, we successively deleted portions of the yeast genome and constructed a mutant that had lost about 5% of the genome and that gave an increased yield of ethanol and glycerol while showing levels of resistance to various stresses nearly equivalent to those of the parental strain. Further systematic deletion could lead to the formation of a eukaryotic cell with a minimum set of genes exhibiting appropriately altered regulation for enhanced metabolite production.

Keywords

Deletion Mutant Deletion Strain Yeast Genome Deletable Region Yeast Peptone Dextrose 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Y. Katou and K. Shirahige for their help in GeneChip analysis, and J. Tkacz for reading and comments on the manuscript. This work was supported by the Project for Development of a Technological Infrastructure for Industrial Bioprocesses on R&D of METI and NEDO.

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kiriko Murakami
    • 1
  • Eriko Tao
    • 1
  • Yuki Ito
    • 1
  • Minetaka Sugiyama
    • 2
  • Yoshinobu Kaneko
    • 2
  • Satoshi Harashima
    • 2
  • Takahiro Sumiya
    • 3
  • Atsushi Nakamura
    • 3
  • Masafumi Nishizawa
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of MedicineKeio UniversityShinjuku, TokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of EngineeringOsaka UniversitySuita, OsakaJapan
  3. 3.RIISEHiroshima UniversityHiroshimaJapan

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