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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 73, Issue 6, pp 1435–1440 | Cite as

Analysis of bacterial communities on aging flue-cured tobacco leaves by 16S rDNA PCR–DGGE technology

  • Mingqin Zhao
  • Baoxiang Wang
  • Fuxin Li
  • Liyou Qiu
  • Fangfang Li
  • Shumin Wang
  • Jike Cui
Applied Microbial and Cell Physiology

Abstract

Many microorganisms, growing on aging flue-cured tobacco leaves, play a part in its fermentation process. These microflora were identified and described by culture-dependent methods earlier. In this study we report the identity of the microflora growing on the tobacco leaf surface by employing culture-independent methods. We have amplified microbial 16S rDNA sequences directly from the leaf surface and used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to identify bacterial community on the tobacco leaves. Our culture-independent methods for the study of microbial community on tobacco leaves showed that microbial community structures on leaves of variety Zhongyan 100, NC89 and Zhongyan 101 were similar between 0 and 6 months aging, and between 9 and 12 months aging, while the similarity is low between 0 and 6, and between 9 and 12 months aging, respectively. There were certain similarities of bacterial communities (similarity up to 63%) among the three tobacco varieties for 0 to 6 months aging. Five dominant 16S rDNA DGGE bands A, B, C, D and E were isolated, cloned, and sequenced. They were most similar to two cultured microbial species Bacteriovorax sp. EPC3, Bacillus megaterium, and three uncultured microbial species, respectively.

Keywords

Flue-cured tobacco Fermentation 16S rDNA PCR–DGGE 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Key Scientific and Technological Project (110200401014) of the China State Tobacco Monopoly Administration. Thanks to Prof. Kun Wu, Dr. Yuansheng Hu, and Dr. Lv Zhenmei for the valuable technical assistance.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mingqin Zhao
    • 1
  • Baoxiang Wang
    • 1
  • Fuxin Li
    • 1
  • Liyou Qiu
    • 1
  • Fangfang Li
    • 1
  • Shumin Wang
    • 1
  • Jike Cui
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Life ScienceHenan Agricultural UniversityZhengzhouChina
  2. 2.Bioinformatics ProgramBoston UniversityBostonUSA

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