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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 72, Issue 2, pp 263–278 | Cite as

A multicomponent reaction–diffusion model of a heterogeneously distributed immobilized enzyme

  • J. L. van Roon
  • M. M. H. D. Arntz
  • A. I. Kallenberg
  • M. A. Paasman
  • J. Tramper
  • C. G. P. H. Schroën
  • H. H. Beeftink
Biotechnological Products and Process Engineering

Abstract

A physical model was derived for the synthesis of the antibiotic cephalexin with an industrial immobilized penicillin G acylase, called Assemblase. In reactions catalyzed by Assemblase, less product and more by-product are formed in comparison with a free-enzyme catalyzed reaction. The model incorporates reaction with a heterogeneous enzyme distribution, electrostatically coupled transport, and pH-dependent dissociation behavior of reactants and is used to obtain insight in the complex interplay between these individual processes leading to the suboptimal conversion. The model was successfully validated with synthesis experiments for conditions ranging from heavily diffusion limited to hardly diffusion limited, including substrate concentrations from 50 to 600 mM, temperatures between 273 and 303 K, and pH values between 6 and 9. During the conversion of the substrates into cephalexin, severe pH gradients inside the biocatalytic particle, which were previously measured by others, were predicted. Physical insight in such intraparticle process dynamics may give important clues for future biocatalyst design. The modular construction of the model may also facilitate its use for other bioconversions with other biocatalysts.

Keywords

Continuous Phase Free Enzyme Sherwood Number Cephalexin Enzyme Loading 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Dr. Ruud van de Sman (Wageningen University) is kindly acknowledged for valuable discussions on process physics. Dr. Dimitris Stamatialis and Prof. Matthias Wessling from Twente University (The Netherlands) are acknowledged for fruitful discussions on mass transport of electrolytes. DSM and The Ministry of Economic Affairs of the Netherlands are kindly acknowledged for their financial support.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. L. van Roon
    • 1
  • M. M. H. D. Arntz
    • 1
  • A. I. Kallenberg
    • 2
  • M. A. Paasman
    • 2
  • J. Tramper
    • 1
  • C. G. P. H. Schroën
    • 1
  • H. H. Beeftink
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Agrotechnology and Food Science, Food and Bioprocess Engineering GroupWageningen UniversityWageningenNetherlands
  2. 2.DSM Anti-Infectives B.V.DelftNetherlands

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