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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 66, Issue 3, pp 318–324 | Cite as

Effect of hyperbaric stress on yeast morphology: study by automated image analysis

  • M. A. Z. Coelho
  • I. Belo
  • R. Pinheiro
  • A. L. Amaral
  • M. Mota
  • J. A. P. Coutinho
  • E. C. Ferreira
Applied Microbial and Cell Physiology

Abstract

The effects of hyperbaric stress on the morphology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied in batch cultures under pressures between 0.1 MPa and 0.6 MPa and different gas compositions (air, oxygen, nitrogen or carbon dioxide), covering aerobic and anaerobic conditions. A method using automatic image analysis for classification of S. cerevisiae cells based on their morphology was developed and applied to experimental data. Information on cell size distribution and bud formation throughout the cell cycle is reported. The results show that the effect of pressure on cell activity strongly depends on the nature of the gas used for pressurization. While nitrogen and air to a maximum of 0.6 MPa of pressure were innocuous to yeast, oxygen and carbon dioxide pressure caused cell inactivation, which was confirmed by the reduction of bud cells with time. Moreover, a decrease in the average cell size was found for cells exposed for 7.5 h to 0.6 MPa CO2.

Keywords

Glucose Consumption Rate Average Cell Size Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure Carbon Dioxide Pressure Cell Size Distribution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

M.A.Z. Coelho is grateful for the scholarship and financial support given by CAPES and CNPq (Brazil) for this work development in Portugal. A.L. Amaral was supported by PRAXIS XXI/BD/20325/99 grant and R. Pinheiro was also supported by PRAXIS XXI/BD/11498/97 grant of Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia (Portugal).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. A. Z. Coelho
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • I. Belo
    • 1
  • R. Pinheiro
    • 1
  • A. L. Amaral
    • 1
  • M. Mota
    • 1
  • J. A. P. Coutinho
    • 2
  • E. C. Ferreira
    • 1
  1. 1.Centro de Engenharia BiológicaUniversidade do MinhoBragaPortugal
  2. 2.CICECO, Departamento de QuímicaUniversidade de AveiroAveiroPortugal
  3. 3.Departamento de Engenharia BioquímicaEscola de Química/UFRJRio de JaneiroBrazil

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