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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 64, Issue 6, pp 745–755 | Cite as

Enzyme reactions and genes in aflatoxin biosynthesis

  • K. Yabe
  • H. Nakajima
Mini-Review

Abstract

Aflatoxins are highly toxic and carcinogenic substances mainly produced by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. Sterigmatocystin is a penultimate precursor of aflatoxins and also a toxic and carcinogenic substance produced by many species, including Aspergillus nidulans. Recently, the majority of the enzyme reactions involved in aflatoxin/sterigmatocystin biosynthesis have been clarified, and the genes encoding the enzymes have been isolated. Most of the genes constitute a large gene cluster in the fungal genome, and their expression is mostly regulated by a product of the regulatory gene aflR. This review will summarize the enzymatic steps and the genes in aflatoxin/sterigmatocystin biosynthesis.

Keywords

Aflatoxin Acyl Carrier Protein Hexanoate Aflatoxin Production Sterigmatocystin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to dedicate this review to the late Professor Takashi Hamasaki, Tottori University, Japan, who contributed greatly to our research. This work was supported in part by a Grant-in-Aid (Bio Design Program) from the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries of Japan (BDP-03-VI-5).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Food Research InstituteIbarakiJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of AgricultureTottori UniversityTottoriJapan

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