Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 63, Issue 5, pp 537–542 | Cite as

Aeration strategy: a need for very high ethanol performance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae fed-batch process

  • S. Alfenore
  • X. Cameleyre
  • L. Benbadis
  • C. Bideaux
  • J.-L. Uribelarrea
  • G. Goma
  • C. Molina-Jouve
  • S. E. Guillouet
Original Paper

Abstract

In order to identify an optimal aeration strategy for intensifying bio-fuel ethanol production in fermentation processes where growth and production have to be managed simultaneously, we quantified the effect of aeration conditions—oxygen limited vs non limited culture (micro-aerobic vs aerobic culture)—on the dynamic behaviour of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivated in very high ethanol performance fed-batch cultures. Fermentation parameters and kinetics were established within a range of ethanol concentrations (up to 147 g l−1), which very few studies have addressed. Higher ethanol titres (147 vs 131 g l−1 in 45 h) and average productivity (3.3 vs 2.6 g l−1 h−1) were obtained in cultures without oxygen limitation. Compared to micro-aerobic culture, full aeration led to a 23% increase in the viable cell mass as a result of the concomitant increase in growth rate and yield, with lower ethanol inhibition. The second beneficial effect of aeration was better management of by-product production, with production of glycerol, the main by-product, being strongly reduced from 12 to 4 g l−1. We demonstrate that aeration strategy is as much a determining factor as vitamin feeding (Alfenore et al. 2002) in very high ethanol performance (147 g l−1 in 45 h) in order to achieve a highly competitive dynamic process.

Keywords

Fermentation Ethanol Production Ethanol Concentration Oxygen Limitation Aeration Condition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Alfenore
    • 1
    • 2
  • X. Cameleyre
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Benbadis
    • 1
  • C. Bideaux
    • 1
  • J.-L. Uribelarrea
    • 1
  • G. Goma
    • 1
  • C. Molina-Jouve
    • 1
  • S. E. Guillouet
    • 1
  1. 1.Biotechnology and Bioprocess Laboratory, UMR-CNRS 5504, UMR-INRA 792, Institut National des Sciences AppliquéesDépartement de Génie Biochimique et AlimentaireToulouse CedexFrance
  2. 2.CRT CRITT Bioindustries, Institut National des Sciences AppliquéesDépartement de Génie Biochimique et AlimentaireToulouse CedexFrance

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