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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 62, Issue 4, pp 349–355 | Cite as

Overproduction of the Aspergillus niger feruloyl esterase for pulp bleaching application

  • E. Record
  • M. Asther
  • C. Sigoillot
  • S. Pagès
  • P. J. Punt
  • M. Delattre
  • M. Haon
  • C. A. M. J. J. van den Hondel
  • J.-C. Sigoillot
  • L. Lesage-Meessen
  • Marcel Asther
Original Paper

Abstract

A well-known industrial fungus for enzyme production, Aspergillus niger, was selected to produce the feruloyl esterase FAEA by homologous overexpression for pulp bleaching application. The gpd gene promoter was used to drive FAEA expression. Changing the nature and concentration of the carbon source nature (maltose to glucose; from 2.5 to 60 g l−1), improved FAEA activity 24.5-fold and a yield of 1 g l−1 of the corresponding protein in the culture medium was achieved. The secreted FAEA was purified 3.5-fold to homogeneity in a two-step purification procedure with a recovery of 69%. The overproduced protein was characterised and presented properties in good agreement with those of native FAEA. The recombinant FAEA was tested for wheat straw pulp bleaching, with or without a laccase mediator system and xylanase. Best results were obtained using a bi-sequential process with a sequence including xylanase, FAEA and laccase, and yielded very efficient delignification—close to 75%—and a kappa number of 3.9. This is the first report on the potential application of recombinant FAEA in the pulp and paper sector.

Keywords

Esterase Activity Kappa Number Pulp Bleaching Feruloyl Esterase Pulp Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Fifth European Framework Program, Quality of Life and Management of Living Resources, key action 1: Food, Nutrition and Health (CROSSENZ : Novel cross-linking enzymes and their consumer acceptance for structure engineering of foods) as well as the GIS-EBL (Conseil Régional Provence-Côte d'Azur and Conseil Général 13, France).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Record
    • 1
  • M. Asther
    • 1
  • C. Sigoillot
    • 1
  • S. Pagès
    • 2
    • 3
  • P. J. Punt
    • 4
  • M. Delattre
    • 1
  • M. Haon
    • 1
  • C. A. M. J. J. van den Hondel
    • 4
  • J.-C. Sigoillot
    • 1
  • L. Lesage-Meessen
    • 1
  • Marcel Asther
    • 1
  1. 1.UMR 1163 INRA/Université de Provence de Biotechnologie des Champignons Filamenteux, IFR-BAIMUniversités de Provence et de la MéditerranéeMarseille Cedex 09France
  2. 2.Laboratoire de Bioénergétique et Ingénierie des Protéines CNRS UPR9036Marseille Cedex 09France
  3. 3.Université de ProvenceMarseilleFrance
  4. 4.Department of Applied Microbiology and Gene TechnologyTNO Nutrition and Food Research InstituteZeistThe Netherlands

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