Immunogenetics

, Volume 49, Issue 3, pp 171–182

Identification and genetic mapping of Xenopus TAP2 genes

  • Y. Ohta
  • S. J. Powis
  • W. John Coadwell
  • Darren E. Haliniewski
  • Y. Liu
  • Hong Li
  • M. F. Flajnik
ORIGINAL PAPER

DOI: 10.1007/s002510050478

Cite this article as:
Ohta, Y., Powis, S., Coadwell, W. et al. Immunogenetics (1999) 49: 171. doi:10.1007/s002510050478

Abstract

 The amphibian Xenopus laevis is one non-mammalian vertebrate in which the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has been analyzed extensively. Class IIβ, class Ia, LMP2, LMP7, HSP70, C4, Factor B, and Ring3 genes have been identified and mapped to the MHC. Here, we report the isolation of a transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) gene, TAP2, and demonstrate its linkage to the MHC. While the ATP-binding region of XenopusTAP2 is highly conserved in evolution, amino acid identity to other vertebrate TAP proteins was not detected in the N-terminal region. Segregation analysis of 34 individuals from two families showed exact restriction fragment length polymorphism matching between the MHC class Ia gene and the one TAP2 gene demonstrating linkage conservation since the mammalian/amphibian divergence ∼350 million years ago. In addition, one non-MHC-linked TAP2–hybridizing fragment was detected in approximately half of the individuals tested. Interestingly, TAP2 allelic lineages appear to match those of LMP7 and classical class I, which previously were categorized into two highly divergent groups that emerged at least 60 million years ago. Similar to LMP7 and class Ia,TAP2 is expressed ubiquitously with highest levels in intestine and spleen.

Key words MHC Transporter Evolution PCR cloning Allelic lineage 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Ohta
    • 1
  • S. J. Powis
    • 2
  • W. John Coadwell
    • 3
  • Darren E. Haliniewski
    • 1
  • Y. Liu
    • 1
  • Hong Li
    • 1
  • M. F. Flajnik
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33101, USAUS
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN, ScotlandGB
  3. 3.Department of Immunology, Babraham Institute, Cambridge, UKGB

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