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Nomenclature report for killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) in macaque species: new genes/alleles, renaming recombinant entities and IPD-NHKIR updates

  • Jesse BruijnesteijnEmail author
  • Natasja G. de Groot
  • Nel Otting
  • Giuseppe Maccari
  • Lisbeth A. Guethlein
  • James Robinson
  • Steven G. E. Marsh
  • Lutz Walter
  • David H. O’Connor
  • John A. Hammond
  • Peter Parham
  • Ronald E. Bontrop
Review
  • 38 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. "Nomenclature, databases and bioinformatics in Immunogenetics"

Abstract

The Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR) are encoded by a diverse group of genes, which are characterized by allelic polymorphism, gene duplications, and recombinations, which may generate recombinant entities. The number of reported macaque KIR sequences is steadily increasing, and these data illustrate a gene system that may match or exceed the complexity of the human KIR cluster. This report lists the names of quality controlled and annotated KIR genes/alleles with all the relevant references for two different macaque species: rhesus and cynomolgus macaques. Numerous recombinant KIR genes in these species necessitate a revision of some of the earlier-published nomenclature guidelines. In addition, this report summarizes the latest information on the Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD)-NHKIR Database, which contains annotated KIR sequences from four non-human primate species.

Keywords

Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors Nomenclature Macaque species Rhesus Cynomolgus Recombinants 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank D. Devine for editing the manuscript.

Funding information

This study was supported in part by NIH/NIAID contract number HHSN272201600007C. GM and JAH are supported by funding from the UKRI-BBSRC awards BB/M011488/1, BBS/E/I/00001710, BBS/E/I/00007030, and BBS/E/I/00007038.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jesse Bruijnesteijn
    • 1
    Email author
  • Natasja G. de Groot
    • 1
  • Nel Otting
    • 1
  • Giuseppe Maccari
    • 2
    • 3
  • Lisbeth A. Guethlein
    • 4
  • James Robinson
    • 3
    • 5
  • Steven G. E. Marsh
    • 3
    • 5
  • Lutz Walter
    • 6
  • David H. O’Connor
    • 7
  • John A. Hammond
    • 2
  • Peter Parham
    • 4
  • Ronald E. Bontrop
    • 1
    • 8
  1. 1.Department of Comparative Genetics and RefinementBiomedical Primate Research CentreRijswijkThe Netherlands
  2. 2.The Pirbright InstituteSurreyUK
  3. 3.Anthony Nolan Research Institute, Royal Free HospitalLondonUK
  4. 4.Department of Structural Biology and Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  5. 5.UCL Cancer InstituteUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  6. 6.Primate Genetics Laboratory, German Primate CenterLeibniz Institute for Primate ResearchGöttingenGermany
  7. 7.Department of Pathology and Laboratory MedicineUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  8. 8.Utrecht University, Theoretical Biology and BioinformaticsUtrechtThe Netherlands

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