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Immunogenetics

, Volume 59, Issue 3, pp 177–186 | Cite as

Analysis of extended HLA haplotypes in multiple sclerosis and narcolepsy families confirms a predisposing effect for the class I region in Tasmanian MS patients

  • Justin P. Rubio
  • Melanie Bahlo
  • Jim Stankovich
  • Rachel K. Burfoot
  • Laura J. Johnson
  • Stewart Huxtable
  • Helmut Butzkueven
  • Ling Lin
  • Bruce V. Taylor
  • Terence P. Speed
  • Trevor J. Kilpatrick
  • Emmanuel Mignot
  • Simon J. Foote
Original Paper

Abstract

Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*15 is associated with predisposition to multiple sclerosis (MS), although conjecture surrounds the possible involvement of an alternate risk locus in the class I region of the HLA complex. We have shown previously that an alternate MS risk allele(s) may be encompassed by the telomerically extended DRB1*15 haplotype, and here, we have attempted to map the putative variant. Thirteen microsatellite markers encompassing a 6.79-megabase (D6S2236–G51152) region, and the DRB1 and DQB1 genes, were genotyped in 166 MS simplex families and 104 control families from the Australian State of Tasmania and 153 narcolepsy simplex families (trios) from the USA. Complementary approaches were used to investigate residual predisposing effects of microsatellite alleles comprising the extended DRB1*15 haplotype taking into account the strong predisposing effect of DRB1*15: (1) Disease association of the extended DRB1*15 haplotype was compared for MS and narcolepsy families—predisposing effects were observed for extended class I microsatellite marker alleles in MS families, but not narcolepsy families; (2) disease association of the extended DRB1*15 haplotype was investigated after conditioning MS and control haplotypes on the absence of DRB1*15—a significant predisposing effect was observed for a 627-kb haplotype (D6S258 allele 8–MOGCA allele 4; MOG, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein) spanning the extended class I region. MOGCA allele 4 displayed the strongest predisposing effect in DRB1*15-conditioned haplotypes (p = 0.0006; OR 2.83 [1.54–5.19]). Together, these data confirm that an alternate MS risk locus exists in the extended class I region in Tasmanian MS patients independent of DRB1*15.

Keywords

Multiple sclerosis Narcolepsy Haplotype 

Notes

Acknowledgement

We thank people with MS and narcolepsy and their families who have been involved in this research. JPR and MB are supported by a Biomedical Career Development Awards from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC). SJF and TPS are fellows of the NHMRC. Our thanks also go to the staff at The Menzies Research Insitute for assisting in the recruitment of Tasmanian families and to the staff at the Australian Genome Research Facility for genotyping. Work contained in this manuscript was funded by project grants from The NHMRC (App ID#257518) and MS Australia. Experiments that contributed to this manuscript were conducted in accordance with the current laws of Australia.

Supplementary material

251_2006_183_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (21 kb)
Table (supplementary data): Percentage of phased marker alleles available for analysis in each haplotype dataset (PDF 21.6 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Justin P. Rubio
    • 1
    • 6
  • Melanie Bahlo
    • 2
  • Jim Stankovich
    • 2
    • 3
  • Rachel K. Burfoot
    • 1
  • Laura J. Johnson
    • 1
  • Stewart Huxtable
    • 2
  • Helmut Butzkueven
    • 1
  • Ling Lin
    • 4
  • Bruce V. Taylor
    • 5
  • Terence P. Speed
    • 2
  • Trevor J. Kilpatrick
    • 1
    • 7
  • Emmanuel Mignot
    • 4
  • Simon J. Foote
    • 3
  1. 1.The Howard Florey InstituteUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical ResearchParkvilleAustralia
  3. 3.The Menzies Research InstituteHobartAustralia
  4. 4.Stanford University Center for NarcolepsyThe Howard Hughes Medical Research InstitutePalo AltoUSA
  5. 5.The Royal Hobart HospitalHobartAustralia
  6. 6.The Neurogenetics Laboratory, The Howard Florey InstituteUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  7. 7.Centre for NeuroscienceUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

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