Immunogenetics

, Volume 55, Issue 7, pp 497–501 | Cite as

The −1030/−862-linked TNF promoter single-nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with the inability to control HIV-1 viremia

  • Julio C. Delgado
  • Jessica Y. Leung
  • Andres Baena
  • Olga P. Clavijo
  • Eric Vittinghoff
  • Susan Buchbinder
  • Steven Wolinsky
  • Marilynn Addo
  • Bruce D. Walker
  • Edmond J. Yunis
  • Anne E. Goldfeld
Brief Communication

Abstract

Control of HIV-1 viremia and progression to AIDS has been associated with specific HLA genes. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and the non-classical major histocompatibility (MHC) class I chain-related A (MICA) genes are located in the genomic segment between the HLA class I and II genes and variants of both genes have been identified. We thus analyzed TNF promoter and MICA variants in a well-characterized group of HIV-1 infected individuals with different abilities to control HIV-1 viremia. In our cohort, the −1030/−862-linked TNF promoter single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), but not MICA variants, are significantly associated with lack of control of HIV-1 viremia (P=0.03). This association is independent of those HLA-B35 alleles associated with HIV-1 disease progression with which the −862 TNF SNP has previously been independently associated. Thus, non-randomly associated genes near the TNF locus are likely involved in control of HIV-1 viremia.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by grants from the NIH (HL-59838 to A.E.G), (AI-28568 to B.D.W), and (HL-67471 to J.C.D.) and from the American Heart Association to A.E.G. We thank Eric Rosenberg, Spyros Kalams, Stephen Boswell and James Braun for providing valuable samples.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julio C. Delgado
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jessica Y. Leung
    • 1
  • Andres Baena
    • 1
  • Olga P. Clavijo
    • 1
  • Eric Vittinghoff
    • 4
  • Susan Buchbinder
    • 4
    • 5
  • Steven Wolinsky
    • 6
  • Marilynn Addo
    • 7
  • Bruce D. Walker
    • 7
  • Edmond J. Yunis
    • 8
  • Anne E. Goldfeld
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Center for Blood ResearchBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PathologyBrigham and Women's HospitalBostonUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineBrigham and Women's HospitalBostonUSA
  4. 4.Department of Epidemiology and StatisticsUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  5. 5.San Francisco Department of Public HealthSan FranciscoUSA
  6. 6.Department of MedicineNorthwestern University Medical SchoolChicagoUSA
  7. 7.Partners AIDS Research CenterMassachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA
  8. 8.Division of Immunology and AIDSDana-Farber Cancer InstituteBostonUSA

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