Immunogenetics

, Volume 55, Issue 4, pp 220–226 | Cite as

Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) nomenclature report, 2002

  • Steven G. E. Marsh
  • Peter Parham
  • Bo Dupont
  • Daniel E. Geraghty
  • John Trowsdale
  • Derek Middleton
  • Carlos Vilches
  • Mary Carrington
  • Campbell Witt
  • Lisbeth A. Guethlein
  • Heather Shilling
  • Christian A. Garcia
  • Katharine C. Hsu
  • Hester Wain
Original Paper

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven G. E. Marsh
    • 1
  • Peter Parham
    • 2
  • Bo Dupont
    • 3
  • Daniel E. Geraghty
    • 4
  • John Trowsdale
    • 5
  • Derek Middleton
    • 6
  • Carlos Vilches
    • 7
  • Mary Carrington
    • 8
  • Campbell Witt
    • 9
  • Lisbeth A. Guethlein
    • 2
  • Heather Shilling
    • 10
  • Christian A. Garcia
    • 11
  • Katharine C. Hsu
    • 3
  • Hester Wain
    • 12
  1. 1.Anthony Nolan Research InstituteRoyal Free HospitalLondonUK
  2. 2.Stanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  3. 3.Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer ResearchNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Fred Hutchinson Cancer CenterSeattleUSA
  5. 5.Cambridge UniversityCambridgeUK
  6. 6.Northern Ireland Tissue Typing LaboratoryBelfastUK
  7. 7.Hospital Puerta de HierroMadridSpain
  8. 8.Frederick Cancer Research and Development CentreFrederickUSA
  9. 9.Royal Perth HospitalPerthAustralia
  10. 10.University of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  11. 11.Anthony Nolan Research InstituteLondonUK
  12. 12.University College LondonLondonUK (HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee)

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