Immunogenetics

, Volume 54, Issue 5, pp 310–313

Association of CTLA-4 variation with type I diabetes in Filipinos

  • William Klitz
  • Teodorica L. Bugawan
  • Araceli Panelo
  • Cecilia M. Solfelix
  • Raffaella Buzzetti
  • Paolo Pozzilli
  • Lori Steiner
  • Maria Alejandrino
  • Henry A. Erlich
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00251-002-0471-7

Cite this article as:
Klitz, W., Bugawan, T.L., Panelo, A. et al. Immunogenetics (2002) 54: 310. doi:10.1007/s00251-002-0471-7

Abstract.

The role of non-HLA single nucleotide polymorphisms from a panel of candidate genes in genetic susceptibility to type I diabetes (TID) among Filipinos was examined by PCR/SSOP typing of 90 patients and 94 controls, previously typed for the HLA class I and class II loci. We report the association of CTLA-4 A49G variation (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated-4) to TID among Filipinos, consistent with some but not all previous reports in other ethnic groups. The G allele frequency (0.61 versus 0.45, P=0.003) and GG genotype frequency (0.42 versus 0.22, P=0.004) were each increased in patients compared to controls, respectively. Among Filipinos, the CTLA-4 genotypes are associated with disease only in the presence of the predisposing DR3, 4, and 9 haplotypes (P=0.012). Compared to the AA genotype, the increased risk of diabetes predisposition is greatest in genotype GG bearing the DR susceptible alleles (DR3, 4, and 9) (odds ratio=4.6, P=0.001), demonstrating that non-HLA loci, acting in concert with HLA, can play potent roles in modifying susceptibility to TID.

Type I diabetes CTLA-4 HLA Filipino 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Klitz
    • 1
  • Teodorica L. Bugawan
    • 3
  • Araceli Panelo
    • 4
  • Cecilia M. Solfelix
    • 4
  • Raffaella Buzzetti
    • 5
  • Paolo Pozzilli
    • 6
  • Lori Steiner
    • 3
  • Maria Alejandrino
    • 1
  • Henry A. Erlich
    • 1
  1. 1.Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, 5700 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Oakland, CA 94609, USA
  2. 2.School of Public Health, University of California, 140 Warren Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720–7360, USA
  3. 3.Department of Human Genetics, Roche Molecular Systems, Inc., 1145 Atlantic Avenue, Alameda, Calif., USA
  4. 4.Institute of Studies on Diabetes Foundation, 5th Floor, UERM Bldg., Magsaysay Blvd., Sta Mesa, Manila, Philippines
  5. 5.Endocrinology, Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Rome "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy
  6. 6.Libera Università Campus Biomedico, Via Longoni 83, 00155 Rome, Italy

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