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European Biophysics Journal

, Volume 35, Issue 6, pp 453–458 | Cite as

Rapid PCR amplification of DNA utilizing Coriolis effects

  • Gustaf Mårtensson
  • Martin Skote
  • Mats Malmqvist
  • Mats Falk
  • Allan Asp
  • Nicke Svanvik
  • Arne Johansson
Article

Abstract

A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method is presented that utilizes Coriolis and centrifugal effects, produced by rotation of the sample disc, in order to increase internal circulatory rates, and with them temperature homogenization and mixing speeds. A proof of concept has been presented by testing a rapid 45-cycle PCR DNA amplification protocol. During the repeated heating and cooling that constitutes a PCR process, the 100 μL samples were rotated at a speed equivalent to an effective acceleration of gravity of 7,000 g. A cycle time of 20.5 s gave a total process time of 15 min to complete the 45 cycles. A theoretical and numerical analysis of the resulting flow, which describes the increased mixing and temperature homogenization, is presented. The device gives excellent reaction speed efficiency, which is beneficial for rapid PCR.

Keywords

Polymerase Chain Reaction Coriolis Force Temperature Homogenization Azimuthal Direction Boundary Condition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© EBSA 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gustaf Mårtensson
    • 1
  • Martin Skote
    • 1
  • Mats Malmqvist
    • 2
  • Mats Falk
    • 2
  • Allan Asp
    • 2
  • Nicke Svanvik
    • 2
  • Arne Johansson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MechanicsRoyal Institute of Technology (KTH)StockholmSweden
  2. 2.AlphaHelix Molecular Diagnostics ABUppsalaSweden

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