Microbial Ecology

, Volume 63, Issue 1, pp 103–115

In-depth Characterization via Complementing Culture-Independent Approaches of the Microbial Community in an Acidic Hot Spring of the Colombian Andes

  • Laura C. Bohorquez
  • Luisa Delgado-Serrano
  • Gina López
  • César Osorio-Forero
  • Vanja Klepac-Ceraj
  • Roberto Kolter
  • Howard Junca
  • Sandra Baena
  • María Mercedes Zambrano
Environmental Microbiology

DOI: 10.1007/s00248-011-9943-3

Cite this article as:
Bohorquez, L.C., Delgado-Serrano, L., López, G. et al. Microb Ecol (2012) 63: 103. doi:10.1007/s00248-011-9943-3

Abstract

The microbial community of a Colombian high mountain hot spring, El Coquito, was analyzed using three different culture-independent assessments of 16S ribosomal RNA genes: clone libraries, pyrosequencing of the V5–V6 hypervariable region, and microarray. This acidic spring had a diverse community composed mainly of Bacteria that shared characteristics with those from other hot springs and extreme acidic environments. The microbial community was dominated by Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Planctomycetes and contained chemotrophic bacteria potentially involved in cycling of ferrous and sulfur-containing minerals and phototrophic organisms, most of which were eukaryotic micro-algae. Despite the presence of a large proportion of novel, unclassified sequences, the taxonomic profiles obtained with each strategy showed similarities at higher taxonomic levels. However, some groups, such as Spirochaetes and Aquificae, were identified using only one methodology, and more taxa were detected with the gene array, which also shared more groups with the pyrosequencing data. Overall, the combined use of different approaches provided a broader view of the microbial community in this acidic hot spring.

Supplementary material

248_2011_9943_MOESM1_ESM.doc (170 kb)
Supplementary Table 1Abundance of taxa from phylum to order for the three methods used. The number of OTUs is shown for Phylochip, the number of total sequences for 454 pyrotags, and the number of sequences for each separate clone library (Bacteria and Archaea). Abundance was determined as the percentage of the total for each strategy. In bold are the subtotals for each group (DOC 170 kb)
248_2011_9943_MOESM2_ESM.pdf (253 kb)
Supplementary Figure 1Phylogenetic reconstruction of sequences from El Coquito hot spring. Green branches indicate unique sequences obtained by Phylochip, dark blue branches indicate unique sequences obtained by 454 pyrotags, light blue indicates unclassified sequences of 454 pyrotags, red branches indicate unique sequences obtained by clone libraries, and black branches indicate reference sequences. The asterisk indicates a novel deepbranching cluster. The scale bar shows the distance of 0.08 nucleotides substitutions per hundred nucleotides (PDF 252 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura C. Bohorquez
    • 1
    • 2
  • Luisa Delgado-Serrano
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gina López
    • 2
    • 3
  • César Osorio-Forero
    • 1
    • 2
  • Vanja Klepac-Ceraj
    • 4
    • 5
  • Roberto Kolter
    • 4
  • Howard Junca
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sandra Baena
    • 2
    • 3
  • María Mercedes Zambrano
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Molecular Genetics & BiotechnologyCorporación CorpoGenBogotáColombia
  2. 2.Colombian Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics of Extreme Environments—GeBiXBogotáColombia
  3. 3.Unidad de Saneamiento y Biotecnología Ambiental, Departamento de BiologíaPontificia Universidad JaverianaBogotáColombia
  4. 4.Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  5. 5.The Forsyth InstituteCambridgeUSA

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