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Pediatric Radiology

, Volume 48, Issue 10, pp 1528–1536 | Cite as

European Society of Paediatric Radiology Abdominal Imaging Task Force recommendations in paediatric uroradiology, part X: how to perform paediatric gastrointestinal ultrasonography, use gadolinium as a contrast agent in children, follow up paediatric testicular microlithiasis, and an update on paediatric contrast-enhanced ultrasound

  • Michael RiccabonaEmail author
  • M. Luisa Lobo
  • Thomas A. Augdal
  • Fred Avni
  • Johan Blickman
  • Costanza Bruno
  • M. Beatrice Damasio
  • Kassa Darge
  • Hans-Joachim Mentzel
  • Marcello Napolitano
  • Aikaterini Ntoulia
  • Frederica Papadopoulou
  • Philippe Petit
  • Magdalena M. Woźniak
  • Lil-Sofie Ording-Müller
ESPR

Abstract

At the European Society of Paediatric Radiology (ESPR) annual meeting 2017 in Davos, Switzerland, the ESPR Abdominal (gastrointestinal and genitourinary) Imaging Task Force set out to complete the suggestions for paediatric abdominal imaging and its procedural recommendations. Some final topics were addressed including how to perform paediatric gastrointestinal ultrasonography. Based on the recent approval of ultrasound (US) contrast agents for paediatric use, important aspects of paediatric contrast-enhanced US were revisited. Additionally, the recent developments concerning the use and possible brain deposition of gadolinium as a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent were presented. The recommendations for paediatric use were reissued after considering all available evidence. Recent insights on the incidence of neoplastic lesions in children with testicular microlithiasis were discussed and led to a slightly altered recommendation.

Keywords

Abdomen Adolescents Children Contrast-enhanced ultrasound Gadolinium Gastrointestinal Magnetic resonance imaging Testicular microlithiasis Ultrasound 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

H.-J. Mentzel has received funding from Bayer Schering for studies on Magnevist and Gadovist in children. No further disclosures. M Riccabona has recieved support from Bracco for Symposia on childhood CEUS.

Selected literature

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Riccabona
    • 1
    Email author
  • M. Luisa Lobo
    • 2
  • Thomas A. Augdal
    • 3
  • Fred Avni
    • 4
  • Johan Blickman
    • 5
  • Costanza Bruno
    • 6
  • M. Beatrice Damasio
    • 7
  • Kassa Darge
    • 8
  • Hans-Joachim Mentzel
    • 9
  • Marcello Napolitano
    • 10
  • Aikaterini Ntoulia
    • 11
  • Frederica Papadopoulou
    • 12
  • Philippe Petit
    • 13
  • Magdalena M. Woźniak
    • 14
  • Lil-Sofie Ording-Müller
    • 15
  1. 1.Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric RadiologyUniversity Hospital LKH GrazGrazAustria
  2. 2.Department of Radiology, Hospital de Santa Maria-CHLNUniversity HospitalLisbonPortugal
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyUniversity Hospital of North NorwayTromsøNorway
  4. 4.Department of Pediatric RadiologyJeanne de Flandre Hospital, CHRU de LilleLille CedexFrance
  5. 5.Department of RadiologyGolisano Children’s HospitalRochesterUSA
  6. 6.Department of Radiology, AOUIVeronaItaly
  7. 7.Department of RadiologyG. Gaslini InstituteGenoaItaly
  8. 8.Department of Radiology, The Children’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  9. 9.Section of Pediatric Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional RadiologyUniversity HospitalJenaGermany
  10. 10.Department of Paediatric Radiology and NeuroradiologyV. Buzzi Children’s HospitalMilanItaly
  11. 11.Department of RadiologyPoole Hospital NHS Foundation TrustPooleUK
  12. 12.Pediatric Ultrasound CenterThessalonikiGreece
  13. 13.Hôpital Timone Enfants, Service d’Imagerie Pédiatrique et PrénataleMarseilleFrance
  14. 14.Department of Pediatric RadiologyMedical University of LublinLublinPoland
  15. 15.Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Unit for Paediatric RadiologyOslo University HospitalOsloNorway

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