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Pediatric Radiology

, Volume 47, Issue 10, pp 1345–1352 | Cite as

Signal intensity at unenhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance in the globus pallidus and dentate nucleus after serial administrations of a macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agent in children

  • Maria Camilla Rossi Espagnet
  • Bruno Bernardi
  • Luca Pasquini
  • Lorenzo Figà-Talamanca
  • Paolo Tomà
  • Antonio Napolitano
Original Article

Abstract

Background

Few studies have been conducted on the relations between T1-weighted signal intensity changes in the pediatric brain following gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) exposure.

Objective

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of multiple administrations of a macrocyclic GBCA on signal intensity in the globus pallidus and dentate nucleus of the pediatric brain on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images.

Materials and methods

This retrospective study included 50 patients, mean age: 8 years (standard deviation: 4.8 years), with normal renal function exposed to ≥6 administrations of the same macrocyclic GBCA (gadoterate meglumine) and a control group of 59 age-matched GBCA-naïve patients. The globus pallidus-to-thalamus signal intensity ratio and dentate nucleus-to-pons signal intensity ratio were calculated from unenhanced T1-weighted images for both patients and controls. A mixed linear model was used to evaluate the effects on signal intensity ratios of the number of GBCA administrations, the time interval between administrations, age, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. T-test analyses were performed to compare signal intensity ratio differences between successive administrations and baseline MR signal intensity ratios in patients compared to controls. P-values were considered significant if <0.05.

Results

A significant effect of the number of GBCA administrations on relative signal intensities globus pallidus-to-thalamus (F[8]=3.09; P=0.002) and dentate nucleus-to-pons (F[8]=2.36; P=0.021) was found. The relative signal intensities were higher at last MR examination than at baseline (P<0.001).

Conclusion

Quantitative analysis evaluation of globus pallidus:thalamus and dentate nucleus:pons of the pediatric brain demonstrated an increase after serial administrations of macrocyclic GBCA. Further research is necessary to fully understand GBCA pharmacokinetic in children.

Keywords

Gadolinium Deposit Pediatric Brain MRI 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

None

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Neuroradiology Unit, Imaging DepartmentOspedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, IRCCSRomeItaly
  2. 2.Neuroradiology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Sant’AndreaUniversity SapienzaRomeItaly
  3. 3.Department of ImagingOspedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, IRCCSRomeItaly
  4. 4.Enterprise Risk Management, Medical Physics DepartmentOspedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, IRCCSRomeItaly

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