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Pediatric Radiology

, Volume 43, Issue 7, pp 796–802 | Cite as

MRI assessment of tenosynovitis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: inter- and intra-observer variability

  • Karen LambotEmail author
  • Peter Boavida
  • Maria Beatrice Damasio
  • Laura Tanturri de Horatio
  • Marie Desgranges
  • Clara Malattia
  • Domenico Barbuti
  • Claudia Bracaglia
  • Lil-Sofie Ording Müller
  • Caroline Elie
  • Brigitte Bader-Meunier
  • Pierre Quartier
  • Karen Rosendahl
  • Francis Brunelle
Original Article

Abstract

Background

There is sparse knowledge about grading tenosynovitis using MRI.

Objective

The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of a tenosynovitis MRI scoring system in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

Materials and methods

Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and wrist involvement were enrolled in two paediatric centres, from October 2006 to January 2010. The extensor (compartments II, IV and VI) and flexor tendons were assessed for the presence of tenosynovitis on T1-weighted postcontrast fat-saturated MR images and were scored from 0 (normal) to 2 (moderate to severe) by two observers independently. Intra- and interobserver agreement was assessed.

Results

Ninety children (age range: 5–18.5 years) were included, of whom 34 had tenosynovitis involving extensors and 28 had tenosynovitis involving flexors. A total of 360 tendon areas were analysed, of which 114 had tenosynovitis (86/270 extensors and 28/90 flexors). Intra-reader 1 agreement was excellent for the extensors (k = 0.82–0.91) and for the flexors (k = 0.85); intra-reader 2 agreement was moderate to good for the extensors (k = 0.51–0.72) and good for the flexors (k = 0.64). Inter-reader agreement was good for the extensors (k = 0.69–0.73) and moderate for the flexors (k = 0.49).

Conclusion

The proposed MRI scoring system for the assessment of wrist tenosynovitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis appears feasible with an observer agreement sufficient for clinical use.

Keywords

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis Children Wrist Tenosynovitis MRI Score 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen Lambot
    • 1
    Email author
  • Peter Boavida
    • 2
  • Maria Beatrice Damasio
    • 3
  • Laura Tanturri de Horatio
    • 4
  • Marie Desgranges
    • 5
  • Clara Malattia
    • 6
  • Domenico Barbuti
    • 4
  • Claudia Bracaglia
    • 7
  • Lil-Sofie Ording Müller
    • 2
    • 8
  • Caroline Elie
    • 9
  • Brigitte Bader-Meunier
    • 5
  • Pierre Quartier
    • 5
  • Karen Rosendahl
    • 2
    • 10
  • Francis Brunelle
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Paediatric RadiologyHôpital Necker-Enfants MaladesParisFrance
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyGreat Ormond Street HospitalLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyOspedale Pediatrico GasliniGenoaItaly
  4. 4.Department of RadiologyOspedale Pediatrico Bambino GesùRomeItaly
  5. 5.Department of Paediatric Immunology, Hematology and Rheumatology, APHP French Reference Center “Arthrites juveniles”Hôpital Necker-Enfants MaladesParisFrance
  6. 6.Department of PaediatricsUniversity of GenoaGenoaItaly
  7. 7.Department of PaediatricsOspedale Pediatrico Bambino GèsuRomeItaly
  8. 8.Department of RadiologyUniversity Hospital of North NorwayTromsøNorway
  9. 9.Department of Biostatistics, Hôpital Necker-Enfants MaladesParis Descartes UniversityParisFrance
  10. 10.Department of RadiologyHaukeland University HospitalBergenNorway

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