Pediatric Radiology

, 40:97 | Cite as

CT enterography of pediatric Crohn disease

  • Jonathan R. Dillman
  • Jeremy Adler
  • Ellen M. Zimmermann
  • Peter J. Strouse
Review

Abstract

CT enterography is an important tool in the noninvasive diagnosis and follow-up of pediatric Crohn disease. This imaging modality is particularly useful for assessing extent of disease (including both intestinal and extraintestinal manifestations), response to medical therapy, and disease-related complications. The purpose of this article is to provide a contemporary review of CT enterography technique as well as the spectrum of intestinal and extraintestinal findings in pediatric Crohn disease.

Keywords

CT Crohn disease Children Bowel imaging 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan R. Dillman
    • 1
  • Jeremy Adler
    • 2
  • Ellen M. Zimmermann
    • 3
  • Peter J. Strouse
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiology, C.S. Mott Children’s HospitalUniversity of Michigan Health SystemAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric GastroenterologyUniversity of Michigan Health SystemAnn ArborUSA
  3. 3.Department of Internal Medicine, Division of GastroenterologyUniversity of Michigan Health SystemAnn ArborUSA

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