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Pediatric Radiology

, Volume 35, Issue 12, pp 1246–1249 | Cite as

Ileocolic intussusception mimicking the imaging appearance of midgut volvulus as a result of extrinsic duodenal obstruction

  • Flavia F. Gasparini
  • Oscar M. Navarro
  • Roshni Dasgupta
  • J. Ted Gerstle
  • Paul S. Thorner
  • David E. Manson
Case Report
  • 88 Downloads

Abstract

Duodenal obstruction caused by ileocolic intussusception in the absence of intestinal malrotation is extremely rare. We present and discuss the imaging findings in an infant with an intussusception secondary to a duplication cyst in whom sonography also showed inversion of the orientation of the mesenteric vessels and a distended stomach. A contrast medium study revealed a proximal duodenal obstruction with a beak appearance suggestive of midgut volvulus. At surgery, an ileocolic intussusception causing duodenal obstruction without concomitant malrotation or volvulus was found. The combination of duodenal obstruction and abnormal relationship of the mesenteric vessels as a result of ileocolic intussusception has not previously been reported in the literature.

Keywords

Intussusception Malrotation Duodenal obstruction 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Flavia F. Gasparini
    • 1
  • Oscar M. Navarro
    • 1
  • Roshni Dasgupta
    • 2
  • J. Ted Gerstle
    • 2
  • Paul S. Thorner
    • 3
  • David E. Manson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick ChildrenUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Division of General Surgery, Hospital for Sick ChildrenUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Division of Pathology, Hospital for Sick ChildrenUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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