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Pediatric Radiology

, Volume 33, Issue 11, pp 797–799 | Cite as

Congenital diplopodia

  • Jason S. Brower
  • Sandra L. Wootton-Gorges
  • John G. Costouros
  • Jennette Boakes
  • Adam Greenspan
Case Report

Abstract

Diplopodia, or duplicated foot, is a rare congenital anomaly. It differs from polydactyly in that supernumerary metatarsal and tarsal bones are present as well as extra digits. Only a few cases of this anomaly have been reported in the literature to date. We present a newborn male without intrauterine teratogen exposure who was born with a duplicate foot of the left lower extremity and imperforate anus.

Keywords

Congenital diplopodia Extremity Foot Newborn 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jason S. Brower
    • 1
  • Sandra L. Wootton-Gorges
    • 1
  • John G. Costouros
    • 1
  • Jennette Boakes
    • 1
  • Adam Greenspan
    • 1
  1. 1.University of California, DavisDepartment of RadiologyDavisUSA

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