Advertisement

Pediatric Cardiology

, Volume 31, Issue 3, pp 430–437 | Cite as

Conotruncal Cardiac Defects: A Clinical Imaging Perspective

  • Tiffanie R. JohnsonEmail author
Riley Symposium

Abstract

Conotruncal cardiac defects make up a significant portion of congenital heart disease. For proper diagnosis and subsequent care of patients with these defects, different and sometimes multiple imaging modalities are needed at various stages of care. This article reviews the characteristics of some of the most common conotruncal defects and the imaging options available along with the advantages and disadvantages of each. Intricate knowledge of the capabilities of each modality will aid the practitioner in making optimal clinical decisions.

Keywords

Cardiac imaging Congenital heart disease Conotruncal heart defects 

References

  1. 1.
    Geva T (2006) Indications and timing of pulmonary valve replacement after tetralogy of Fallot repair. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg Pediatr Card Surg Ann 9:11–22CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Geva T, Powell AJ (2008) Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Allen HD, Driscoll DJ, Shaddy RE, Feltes TF (eds) Moss and Adams’ heart disease in infants, children, and adolescents, 7th edn. Lippincott, Philadelphia, PA, pp 163–199Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Grothues F, Moon JC, Bellenger NG, Smith GS (2004) Interstudy reproducibility of right ventricular volumes, function, and mass with cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Am Heart J 147:218–223CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Khairy P, Landzberg MJ, Lambert J et al (2004) Long-term outcomes after the atrial switch for surgical correction of transposition: a meta-analysis comparing the Mustard and Senning procedures. Cardiol Young 14:284–292CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kleinman CS, Glickstein JS, Shaw R (2008) Fetal echocardiography and fetal cardiology. In: Allen HD, Driscoll DJ, Shaddy RE, Feltes TF (eds) Moss and Adams’ heart disease in infants, children, and adolescents, 7th edn. Lippincott, Philadelphia, PA, pp 592–617Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Lorenz CH, Walker WS, Graham TP et al (1995) Right ventricular performance and mass by use of cine MRI late after atrial repair of transposition of the great arteries. Circulation 92:233–239Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Moons P, Bewillig M, Sluysmans T et al (2004) Long term outcome up to 30 years after the Mustard or Senning operation: a nationwide multicentre study in Belgium. Heart 90:307–313CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Niwa K, Perloff JK, Bhuta SM et al (2001) Structural abnormalities of great arterial walls in congenital heart disease. Circulation 103:393–400PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Niwa K, Siu SC, Webb GD et al (2002) Progressive aortic root dilatation in adults late after repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Circulation 106:1374–1378CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Pennel DJ, Sechtem UP, Higgins CB et al (2004) Clinical indications for cardiovascular magnetic resonance: consensus panel report. Eur Heart J 25:1940–1965CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Perry LW, Neill CA, Ferencz C (1993) Infants with congenital heart disease: The cases. In: Ferencz C, Rubin JD, Loffredo CA et al (eds) Perspectives in pediatric cardiology. Epidemiology of congenital heart disease, the Baltimore-Washington Infant Study 1981–1989. Futura, Armonk, NY, pp 33–62Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Rathi VK, Doyle M, Williams RB et al (2005) Massive aortic aneurysm and dissection in repaired tetralogy of Fallot: diagnosis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. Int J Cardiol 101:169–170CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Roos-Hesselink JW, Meijboom FJ, Spitaels SEC et al (2004) Decline in ventricular function and clinical condition after Mustard repair for transposition of the great arteries (a prospective study of 22–29 years). Eur Heart J 25:1264–1270CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Schroeder S, Achenbach S, Bengel F et al (2008) Cardiac computed tomography: indications, applications, limitations, and training requirements. Eur Heart J 29:531–556CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Siwik ES, Erenberg F, Zahka K (2008) Tetralogy of Fallot. In: Allen HD, Driscoll DJ, Shaddy RE, Feltes TF et al (eds) Moss and Adams’ heart disease in infants, children, and adolescents, 7th edn. Lippincott, Philadelphia, PA, p 515Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Sridaramont S, Ritter DG, Feldt RH (1976) Double-outlet right ventricle: anatomic and angiocardiographic correlations. Am J Cardiol 38:85–94CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Srivastava D, Baldwin HS (2008) Molecular determinants of cardiac development and disease. In: Allen HD, Driscoll DJ, Shaddy RE, Feltes TF (eds) Moss and Adams’ heart disease in infants, children, and adolescents, 7th edn. Lippincott, Philadelphia, PA, p 515Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Therrien J, Provost Y, Merchant N et al (2005) Optimal timing for pulmonary valve replacement in adults after tetralogy of Fallot repair. Am J Cardiol 95:779–782CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Valsangiacomo Buechel ER, Dave HH, Kellenberger CJ et al (2005) Remodelling of the right ventricle after early pulmonary valve replacement in children with repaired tetralogy of Fallot: assessment by cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Eur Heart J 26:2721–2727CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Van Praagh R, Van Praagh S (1965) The anatomy of common aorticopulmonary trunk (truncus areterosus communis) and its embryologic implications: a study of 57 necropsy cases. Am J Cardiol 16:406–425CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Vliegen HW, van Straten A, de Roos A et al (2002) Magnetic resonance imaging to assess the hemodynamic effects of pulmonary valve replacement in adults late after repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Circulation 106:1703–1707CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Wernovsky G (2008) Transposition of the great arteries. In: Allen HD, Driscoll DJ, Shaddy RE, Feltes TF (eds) Moss and Adams’ heart disease in infants, children, and adolescents, 7th edn. Lippincott, Philadelphia, PA, pp 1038–1087Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Yetman AT, Graham TG (2009) The dilated aorta in patients with congenital cardiac defects. J Am Coll Cardiol 53:461–467CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Zucker N, Rozin I, Levitas A et al (2004) Clinical presentation, natural history, and outcome of patient with the absent pulmonary valve syndrome. Cardiol Young 14:402–408CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Section of Pediatric Cardiology, Riley Hospital for ChildrenIndiana University School of MedicineIndianapolisUSA

Personalised recommendations