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Reply to Comment on “Bioaccumulation of Methyl Siloxanes in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) and in an Estuarine Food Web in Northeastern China”

  • Xiaohong Xue
  • Hongliang Jia
  • Jingchuan XueEmail author
Reply to comment

Response to “Measurement of BCFs”

In our paper (Xue et al. 2019), we calculated the BCF based on the dry weight of common carp. Kim et al. ( 2019) stated that wet weight, instead of dry weight, should be used in the expression of bioaccumulation metrics. Here, we recalculated the kinetic parameters k 1 and k 2, BCF and half-lives ( t 0.5) based on the wet weight data of methyl siloxanes in common carp (Table  1). The water and lipid content of common carp samples were listed in Appendix. The updated regression curves for D4, D5, and D7, in the uptake period, had the coefficient of regression ( R 2) of 0.827, 0.829, and 0.943, respectively (Fig.  1), indicating the regression fit data well. The R 2 for D6 and L10 were 0.674 and 0.733, respectively, suggesting that approximately 67% and 73% of the variance in the response variable can be explained by the explanatory variable for these two compounds, respectively. In depuration period, the R 2for D4, D5, D6, D7, and L10 were 0.959, 0.894, 0.853,...

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of ScienceDalian Maritime UniversityDalianChina
  2. 2.International Joint Research Centre for Persistent Toxic Substances (IJRC-PTS), College of Environmental Science and EngineeringDalian Maritime UniversityDalianChina
  3. 3.Department of Environmental Sciences and EngineeringUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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