Outdoor Air PCB Concentrations in Three Communities Along the Upper Hudson River, New York

  • Patrick M. Palmer
  • Erin E. Belanger
  • Lloyd R. Wilson
  • Syni-An A. Hwang
  • Rajinder S. Narang
  • Marta I. Gomez
  • Michael R. Cayo
  • Lorie A. Durocher
  • Edward F. Fitzgerald
Article

Abstract

Outdoor air polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations were measured in upstate New York as part of a nonoccupational exposure investigation. The adjacent study communities of Hudson Falls and Fort Edward contain numerous sites of current and former PCB contamination, including two capacitor-manufacturing facilities. Outdoor air PCB concentrations in the study municipalities were significantly higher than in the comparison municipality of Glens Falls. Total PCB concentrations in the study area ranged from 0.102 to 4.011 ng/m3 (median: 0.711 ng/m3). For the comparison area, concentrations ranged from 0.080 to 2.366 ng/m3 (median: 0.431 ng/m3). Although our sampling was not designed to identify point sources, the presence of PCB-contaminated sites in the study area likely contributed to this observed difference in concentration. While elevated relative to the comparison area, total PCB concentrations in the study area are lower than those in other communities with known PCB-contaminated sites, and similar to levels reported in other locations from the northeastern United States.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick M. Palmer
    • 1
  • Erin E. Belanger
    • 2
  • Lloyd R. Wilson
    • 1
    • 3
  • Syni-An A. Hwang
    • 2
    • 3
  • Rajinder S. Narang
    • 4
  • Marta I. Gomez
    • 2
  • Michael R. Cayo
    • 2
  • Lorie A. Durocher
    • 4
  • Edward F. Fitzgerald
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Bureau of Water Supply Protection, New York State Department of HealthTroyUSA
  2. 2.Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology, New York State Department of HealthTroyUSA
  3. 3.School of Public Health, University at AlbanyRensselaerUSA
  4. 4.Biggs Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of HealthAlbanyUSA

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