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Neuroradiology

, Volume 44, Issue 2, pp 133–137 | Cite as

Transcortical mixed aphasia due to cerebral infarction in left inferior frontal lobe and temporo-parietal lobe

  •  S. Maeshima
  •  H. Toshiro
  •  E. Sekiguchi
  •  R. Okita
  •  H. Yamaga
  •  F. Ozaki
  •  H. Moriwaki
  •  T. Matsumoto
  •  A. Ueyoshi
  •  P. Roger
Diagnostic Neuroradiology

Abstract.

We present a case of transcortical mixed aphasia caused by a cerebral embolism. A 77-year-old right-handed man was admitted to our hospital with speech disturbance and a right hemianopia. His spontaneous speech was remarkably reduced, and object naming, word fluency, comprehension, reading and writing were all severely disturbed. However, repetition of phonemes and sentences and reading aloud were fully preserved. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebral infarcts in the left frontal and parieto-occipital lobe which included the inferior frontal gyrus and angular gyrus, single photon emission CT revealed a wider area of low perfusion over the entire left hemisphere except for part of the left perisylvian language areas. The amytal (Wada) test, which was performed via the left internal carotid artery, revealed that the left hemisphere was dominant for language. Hence, it appears that transcortical mixed aphasia may be caused by the isolation of perisylvian speech areas, even if there is a lesion in the inferior frontal gyrus, due to disconnection from surrounding areas.

Aphasia Cerebral blood flow Repetition Speech area 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  •  S. Maeshima
    • 1
  •  H. Toshiro
    • 2
  •  E. Sekiguchi
    • 2
  •  R. Okita
    • 2
  •  H. Yamaga
    • 2
  •  F. Ozaki
    • 2
  •  H. Moriwaki
    • 2
  •  T. Matsumoto
    • 1
  •  A. Ueyoshi
    • 1
  •  P. Roger
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Wakayama Medical University, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama 641-0012, Japan
  2. 2.Department of Neurological Surgery, Hidaka General Hospital, Wakayama, Japan
  3. 3.School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

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