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Neuroradiology

, Volume 46, Issue 9, pp 764–769 | Cite as

MR spectroscopy of cervical spinal cord in patients with multiple sclerosis

  • Ayşe Tuba Karagülle KendiEmail author
  • Funda Uysal Tan
  • Mustafa Kendi
  • Sinef Huvaj
  • Serdar Tellioğlu
Diagnostic Neuroradiology

Abstract

MR spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain in patients with multiple sclerosis has been well studied. However, in vivo MRS of the spinal cord in patients with MR spectroscopy has not been reported to our knowledge. We performed MRS of normal-appearing cervical spinal cords in multiple sclerosis patients and in healthy controls. N-acetyl aspartate was shown to be reduced within the cervical spinal cord of multiple sclerosis patients when compared with healthy controls. This finding supports axonal loss and damage within even normal-appearing spinal cords of multiple sclerosis patients.

Keywords

Multiple sclerosis Magnetic resonance spectroscopy Spinal cord 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ayşe Tuba Karagülle Kendi
    • 1
    • 5
    Email author
  • Funda Uysal Tan
    • 2
  • Mustafa Kendi
    • 3
  • Sinef Huvaj
    • 4
  • Serdar Tellioğlu
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for MR ResearchUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Neurology DepartmentKırıkkale University School of MedicineKırıkkaleTurkey
  3. 3.MinneapolisUSA
  4. 4.Radiology DepartmentKırıkkale University School of MedicineKırıkkaleTurkey
  5. 5.Radiology DepartmentKırıkkale University School of MedicineKırıkkaleTurkey

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