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The Journal of Membrane Biology

, Volume 175, Issue 2, pp 123–138 | Cite as

Very Negative Potential for Half-inactivation of, and Effects of Anions on, Voltage-dependent Sodium Currents in Acutely Isolated Rat Olfactory Receptor Neurons

  • W.  Qu
  • A.J.  Moorhouse
  • S.  Rajendra
  • P.H.  Barry
Article

Abstract

Previous measurements with CsF pipette solutions using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in dissociated rat olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) indicated that the sodium currents had very negative inactivation characteristics with the implication that the cell resting potential must also normally have a very negative value. This study supports the conclusions that such an effect was real and not dependent on either the nature of the pipette anions or the recording situation previously used. For all pipette solutions, sodium currents showed a threshold activation ≈−80 mV and half-maximal activation voltages ≈−55 with half-inactivation potential ≤−100 mV, without being significantly affected by the replacement of F by other pipette anions (H2PO 4 and acetate) or the addition of nucleotides and glutathione (which did cause a very slight positive shift). F, followed by H2PO 4 and to a much lesser extent by acetate, was the most favorable pipette anion for obtaining good seals and whole-cell sodium currents in these extremely small ORNs. These results implied that resting potentials, for viable responsive cells, should be more negative than about −90 mV, as supported by the observation that action potentials could only be evoked from holding potentials more negative than −90 mV.

Key words: Olfactory receptor neuron — Sodium currents — Fluoride — Phosphate — Acetate — Patch clamp 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • W.  Qu
    • 1
  • A.J.  Moorhouse
    • 1
  • S.  Rajendra
    • 1
  • P.H.  Barry
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Physiology and PharmacologyThe University of New South WalesSydneyAustralia

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