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The Journal of Membrane Biology

, Volume 245, Issue 11, pp 675–681 | Cite as

Oxidative Parameters in the Rat Brain of Chronic Mild Stress Model for Depression: Relation to Anhedonia-Like Responses

  • Chao Wang
  • He-ming Wu
  • Xiao-rong Jing
  • Qiang Meng
  • Bei Liu
  • Hua Zhang
  • Guo-dong Gao
Article

Abstract

The chronic mild stress (CMS) protocol is widely used to evoke depression-like behaviors in the laboratory. Some animals exposed to CMS are resistant to the development of anhedonia, whereas the remaining are responsive, CMS-resilient and CMS-sensitive, respectively. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of chronic stress on oxidative parameters in the rat brain. The consumption of sweet food, protein and lipid oxidation levels and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in the rat hippocampus, cortex and cerebellum were assessed. We found a significant increase in protein peroxidation (hippocampus and cortex), a significant increase in catalase activity (cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum) and a decrease in superoxide dismutase activity (cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum) in the CMS-sensitive group compared to the CMS-resilient group and normal controls as well as an increase in lipid peroxidation (cerebellum) in the CMS-sensitive and CMS-resilient groups compared to normal controls. However, there was no significant difference in protein peroxidation (cerebellum) and lipid peroxidation (cortex and hippocampus) among the three groups. In conclusion, our results indicate that the segregation into CMS-sensitive and -resilient groups based on sucrose intake is paralleled by significant differences in oxidative parameters. CMS induces oxidative damage and alterations in the activity of antioxidants which may lead to increased oxidative damage, irrespective of the anhedonia-like status of the stressed animals.

Keywords

Anhedonia Oxidative parameter Stress Anhedonia-like response 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Institute of Functional Brain Disorders of PLA.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chao Wang
    • 1
  • He-ming Wu
    • 1
  • Xiao-rong Jing
    • 1
  • Qiang Meng
    • 1
  • Bei Liu
    • 1
  • Hua Zhang
    • 1
  • Guo-dong Gao
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryInstitute of Functional Brain Disorders of PLA, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical UniversityXi’anChina

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