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The Journal of Membrane Biology

, Volume 183, Issue 3, pp 147–153 | Cite as

Gap Junctional Channels Regulate Acid Secretion in the Mammalian Gastric Gland

  • K.  Radebold
  • E.  Horakova
  • J.  Gloeckner
  • G.  Ortega
  • D.C.  Spray
  • H.  Vieweger
  • K.  Siebert
  • L.  Manuelidis
  • J.P.  Geibel

Abstract.

Gap junction channels are regarded as a primary pathway for intercellular message transfer, including calcium wave propagation. Our study identified two gap junctional proteins, connexin26 and connexin32, in rat gastric glands by RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence. We demonstrated a potential physiological role of the gap junctional channels in the acid secretory process using the calcium indicator fluo-3, and microinjection of Lucifer Yellow. Application of gastrin (10−7 m) to the basolateral membrane resulted in the induction of uniphasic calcium signals in adjacent parietal cells. In addition, single parietal cell microinjections in intact glands with the cell-impermeant dye Lucifer Yellow resulted in a transfer of dye from the injected cell to the adjacent parietal cell following gastrin stimulation, demonstrating gastrin-induced cell-to-cell communication. Both calcium wave propagation and Lucifer Yellow transfer were blocked by the gap junction inhibitor 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid. Our studies demonstrate that functional gap junction channels in gastric glands provide an effective means for rapid cell-to-cell communication and allow for the rapid onset of acid secretion.

Key words: Stomach — Intracellular calcium — Calcium signaling — Parietal cells — Cell-to-cell communication — Lucifer Yellow 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • K.  Radebold
    • 1
  • E.  Horakova
    • 1
  • J.  Gloeckner
    • 1
  • G.  Ortega
    • 1
  • D.C.  Spray
    • 2
  • H.  Vieweger
    • 1
  • K.  Siebert
    • 1
  • L.  Manuelidis
    • 3
  • J.P.  Geibel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, BML 263, 310 Cedar St., New Haven, CT 06510, USAUS
  2. 2.Department of Neuroscience and Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USAUS
  3. 3.Section of Neuropathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USAUS

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