Advertisement

Heat and Mass Transfer

, Volume 55, Issue 2, pp 299–308 | Cite as

The effects of some exergetic indicators on the performance of thin layer drying process of long green pepper in a solar dryer

  • Ebru Kavak AkpinarEmail author
Original
  • 129 Downloads

Abstract

In this study, exergy analysis of the thin layer drying process of long green pepper was performed in solar dryer with forced convection. The effects of some exergetic indicators on the performance of a thin layer solar drying system by using the experimental data in the literature for long green pepper (Akpinar and Bicer in Energy Convers Manag 49: 1367–1375, 2008) were investigated. For this purpose, the exergetic indicators such as exergetic efficiency, waste exergy ratio, environmental impact factor, exergetic sustainability index and improvement potential, previously used in the literature, were taken into account (Zisopoulos et al. in Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 57(1):197–211, 2017, Midilli and Kucuk in Int J Exergy 16(3): 278–292, 2015, Van Gool 1997). The exergetic efficiency and improvement potential of the solar drying system decreased with the increase of drying time. The waste exergy ratio increased with the increase of drying time. The exergetic sustainability index increased with increasing the exergetic efficiency, decreased with decreasing the exergetic efficiency. The environmental impact factor decreased with increasing the exergetic efficiency.

Keywords

Solar drying Forced drying Long green pepper Exergetic indicators 

Nomenclature

cp

specific heat of drying air, (kJkg−1K -1)

EUR

energy utilization ratio

EIF

environmental impact factor

ESI

exergetic sustainability index

\( \overset{\cdot }{E}x \)

Exergy, (kW)

h

enthalpy, (kJ/kg)

IP

Improvement potential, (kW)

\( \overset{\cdot }{m} \)

mass flow rate, (kgs−1)

WER

waste exergy ratio

Greek letters

η

efficiency

Subscripts

c

collector

d

destruction

da

drying air

dci

drying cabinet inlet

dco

drying cabinet outlet

eus

exergy used

ex

exergy, exergetic

f

fan

i, in

inlet

L

loss

o

outlet

sol

solar

Notes

Acknowledgments

Authors thank Firat University Research Foundation (FUBAP) for financial support, under project number 943.

References

  1. 1.
    Agrawal A, Sarviya RM (2016) A review of research and development work on solar dryers with heat storage. Int J Sustain Energy 35:583–605CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Rabha DK, Muthukumar P (2017) Performance studies on a forced convection solar dryer integrated with a paraffin wax–based latent heat storage system. Sol Energy 149:214–226CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Fudholi A, Sopian K, Othman MY, Ruslan MH (2014) Energy and exergy analyses of solar drying system of red seaweed. Energ Buildings 68:121–129CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Tsatsaronis G (2007) Definitions and nomenclature in exergy analysis and exergoeconomics. Energy 32:249–253CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Celma AR, Cuadros F (2009) Energy and exergy analyses of OMW solar drying process. Renew Energy 34:660–666CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Zisopoulos FK, Rossier-Miranda FJ, Goot AJVD, Boom RM (2017) The use of exergetic indicators in the food industry – a review. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 57(1):197–211.  https://doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2014.975335 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Midilli A, Dincer I (2009) Development of some exergetic parameters for PEM fuel cells for measuring environmental impact and sustainability. Int J Hydrog Energy 34(9):3858–3872CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Midilli A, Kucuk H, Dincer I (2012) Environmental and sustainability aspects of a recirculating aquaculture system. Environ Prog Sustain Energy 31(4):604–611CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Midilli A, Kucuk H (2015) Assessment of exergetic sustainability indicators for a single layer solar drying system. Int J Exergy 16(3):278–292CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Boulemtafes-Boukadoum A, Benzaoui A (2011) Energy and exergy analysis of solar drying process of mint. Energy Procedia 6:583–591CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Dincer I, Sahin AZ (2004) A new model for thermodynamic analysis of a drying process. Int J Heat Mass Transf 47(4):645–652CrossRefzbMATHGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Midilli A, Kucuk H (2003) Energy and exergy analyses of solar drying process of pistachio. Energy 28:539–556CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Akbulut A, Durmus A (2010) Energy and exergy analyses of thin layer drying of mulberry in a forced solar dryer. Energy 35:1754–1763CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Akpinar EK (2010) Drying of mint leaves in a solar dryer and under open sun: modelling, performance analyses. Energy Convers Manag 51:2407–2418CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Sami S, Etesami N, Rahimi A (2011) Energy and exergy analysis of an indirect solar cabinet dryer based on mathematical modeling results. Energy 36:2847–2855CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Chowdhury MMI, Bala BK, Haque MA (2011) Energy and exergy analysis of the solar drying of jackfruit leather. Biosyst Eng 110:222–229CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Ozgener L, Ozgener O (2009) Exergy analysis of drying process: an experimental study in solar greenhouse. Dry Technol 27:580–586CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Akpinar EK (2004) Energy and exergy analysis of drying of red pepper slices in a convective type dryer. Int Commun Heat Mass Transfer 31(8):1165–1176CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Akpinar EK (2011) Drying of parsley leaves in a solar dryer and under open sun: energy and exergy aspects. J Food Process Eng 34:27–48CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Akpinar EK, Midilli A, Bicer Y (2005) Energy and exergy of potato drying process via cyclone type dryer. Energy Convers Manag 46(15/16):2530–2552CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Fudholi A, Sopian K, Yazdi MH, Ruslan MH, Gabbasa M, Kazem HA (2014) Performance analysis of solar drying system for red chili. Sol Energy 99:47–54CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Fudholi A, Sopian K, Alghoul MA, Ruslan MH, Othman OY (2015) Performances and improvement potential of solar drying system for palm oil fronds. Renew Energy 78:561–565CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Rabha DK, Muthukumar P, Somayaji C (2017) Energy and exergy analyses of the solar drying processes of ghost chilli pepper and ginger. Renew Energy 105:764–773CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Akpinar EK, Bicer Y (2008) Mathematical modelling of thin layer drying process of long green pepper in solar dryer and under open sun. Energy Convers Manag 49:1367–1375CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Van Gool W (1997) Energy policy: Fairly Tales and Factualities. In: Innovation and Technology. Kluwer, DordrechtGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Mechanical Engineering DepartmentFirat UniversityElazigTurkey

Personalised recommendations