Heat and Mass Transfer

, Volume 43, Issue 3, pp 255–264

Numerical simulation of forced convection in a duct subjected to microwave heating

Original

Abstract

In this paper, forced convection in a rectangular duct subjected to microwave heating is investigated. Three types of non-Newtonian liquids flowing through the duct are considered, specifically, apple sauce, skim milk, and tomato sauce. A finite difference time domain method is used to solve Maxwell’s equations simulating the electromagnetic field. The three-dimensional temperature field is determined by solving the coupled momentum, energy, and Maxwell’s equations. Numerical results show that the heating pattern strongly depends on the dielectric properties of the fluid in the duct and the geometry of the microwave heating system.

List of symbols

A

area (m2)

Cp

specific heat capacity (J/(kg K))

c

phase velocity of the electromagnetic propagation wave (m/s)

E

electric field intensity (V/m)

f

frequency of the incident wave (Hz)

h

effective heat transfer coefficient (W/(m2 K))

H

magnetic field intensity (A/m)

L

standard deviation of temperature (°C)

k

thermal conductivity (W/(m K))

m

fluid consistency coefficient, (Pa sn)

n

flow behavior index

Nt

number of time steps

p

pressure (Pa)

q

electromagnetic heat generation intensity (W/m3)

Q

volume flow rate (m3/s)

T

temperature (°C)

t

time (s)

tan δ

loss tangent

w

velocity component in the z direction (m/s)

W

width of the cavity (m)

ZTE

wave impedance (Ω)

Greek symbols

η

apparent viscosity (Pa s)

ε

electric permittivity (F/m)

ɛ′

dielectric constant

ɛ′′

effective loss factor

λg

wave length in the cavity (m)

μ

magnetic permeability (H/m)

ρ

density (kg/m3)

σ

electric conductivity (S/m)

Superscripts

τ

instantaneous value

Subscripts

ambient condition

0

free space, air

inc

incident plane

in

inlet

x, y, z

coordinate system of the applicator

X, Y, Z

coordinate system of the microwave cavity

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace EngineeringNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA
  2. 2.Department of Food ScienceNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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