Advertisement

European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

, Volume 50, Issue 6, pp 457–461 | Cite as

Effect of N-acetylcysteine(NAC) treatment on HIV-1 infection: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial

  • B. Åkerlund
  • C. Jarstrand
  • B. Lindeke
  • A. Sönnerborg
  • A.-C. Åkerblad
  • O. Rasool
PHARMACODYNAMICS

Abstract

Objective: In a double-blind placebo-controlled trial, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive patients with a CD4 lymphocyte cell count of more than 200 × 106⋅l−1 were randomised to receive either 800 mg N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or placebo for 4 months. Before treatment low plasma cysteine levels, high free radical activity in neutrophils in the presence of autologous plasma – measured by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) test – and increased tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were found in the HIV positive patients.

Results:

After treatment the low plasma cysteine level in the NAC group increased to normal, and the decline of the CD4+ lymphocyte count before the study start, was less steep in the NAC group than in the placebo group after treatment. There was also a reduction in TNF-α level. However, NAC had no effect on the radical production by neutrophils, and although it did not increase the CD4+ cell count, it may have decreased the decline in CD4+ cells.

Conclusion:

Further controlled trials with NAC are needed to devermine whether it has a beneficial effect in the treatment of asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals.

Key words N-acetylcysteine treatment HIV-1 infection; oxidative stress free radical generation 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Åkerlund
    • 1
  • C. Jarstrand
    • 2
  • B. Lindeke
    • 3
  • A. Sönnerborg
    • 4
  • A.-C. Åkerblad
    • 5
  • O. Rasool
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, S-141 86 Huddinge, SwedenSE
  2. 2.Department of Bacteriology, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Huddinge, SwedenSE
  3. 3.Swedish Academy of Pharmaceutical Science, Stockholm, SwedenSE
  4. 4.Department of Virology, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Huddinge, SwedenSE
  5. 5.Pfizer AB, Taby, SwedenSE

Personalised recommendations