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Pharmacokinetics of meropenem in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid in patients with intraventricular hemorrhage after lateral ventricle drainage

  • Hongzhou Xu
  • Lingti Kong
  • Chenchen Wu
  • Bo Xu
  • Xiaofei WuEmail author
Letter to the Editor
  • 27 Downloads

Lateral ventricular drainage is a common method for treatment of intraventricular hemorrhage (ICH). This technique significantly reduces intracranial pressure by draining cerebrospinal fluid from the brain. However, intracranial infection is one of the major complications of ventricular drainage placement [1]. Previous studies revealed that Gram-positive extracellular pathogen, like Coagulase negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus, are the most common pathogen of intracranial infection, followed by Gram-negative bacillary and anaerobes [2, 3].

Because most gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria are sensitive to meropenem, it has been successfully used as a treatment for bacterial meningitis [4, 5, 6]. Moreover, meropenem has also been recommended for treatment of pneumococcal meningitis with penicillin and cephalosporin resistance and Gram-negative bacterial meningitis with resistance to preferred treatment drugs [7, 8].

ICH patients experience augmented renal clearance and...

Notes

Funding

This study was supported by the Research Innovation Program for College Graduates of Bengbu Medical College (Byycx1761 and Byycxz1833).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Emergency Internal MedicineThe First Affiliated Hospital of Bengbu Medical CollegeBengbuChina
  2. 2.Department of PharmacyThe First Affiliated Hospital of Bengbu Medical CollegeBengbuChina
  3. 3.Department of EndocrinologyThe First Affiliated Hospital of Bengbu Medical CollegeBengbuChina

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