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European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

, Volume 62, Issue 4, pp 333–334 | Cite as

Cytochrome P450 2D6 dependent metabolization of risperidone is inhibited by melperone

  • Michael D. Köhnke
  • Ulrich Lutz
  • Gerlinde Wiatr
  • Frank Schwärzler
  • Bastian Weller
  • Klaus Schott
  • Gerhard Buchkremer
Letter to the Editors

Dear Editors:

Melperone is an antipsychotic drug used for sleep induction [1, 4, 11]. Grözinger et al. [8] revealed an inhibitory effect of melperone on the hepatic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) catalyzed O-demethylation of dextromethorphan and of the antidepressant venlafaxine. We report an inhibitory effect of melperone on the metabolization of the antipsychotic risperidone, a substrate of CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 [15], and give further evidence for a melperone dependent inhibition of CYP2D6.

In all cases, blood was drawn 12 h after the last intake of medication, at steady state, defined by a constant dose over at least 7 days. Plasma concentrations were analyzed by standard procedures (mass spectroscopy, internal standard; Bioscientia, Ingelheim, Germany).

Individual one, a 19-year-old schizophrenic male, with a post psychotic lack of initiation, received 6 mg of risperidone per day. 50 mg of melperone per day were added for sleep induction. The initial risperidone plasma concentration of...

Keywords

Risperidone Metoprolol Venlafaxine Dextromethorphan Psychotic Depression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael D. Köhnke
    • 1
  • Ulrich Lutz
    • 1
  • Gerlinde Wiatr
    • 1
  • Frank Schwärzler
    • 1
  • Bastian Weller
    • 1
  • Klaus Schott
    • 1
  • Gerhard Buchkremer
    • 1
  1. 1.University Hospital of Psychiatry and PsychotherapyTübingen University HospitalTübingenGermany

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