Advertisement

Marine Biology

, Volume 136, Issue 2, pp 207–216 | Cite as

Analysis of genetic structure of blacklip abalone (Haliotis rubra) populations using RAPD, minisatellite and microsatellite markers

  • B. X. Huang
  • R. Peakall
  • P. J. Hanna
Original

Abstract

 We investigated the utility of three polymerase chain-reaction (PCR)-based DNA molecular markers in analysing genetic structure of the populations of the blacklip abalone Haliotis rubra (Leach) of Victoria, Australia. The DNA markers included 84 randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) bands amplified using six random primers, two minisatellites, GHR (putative growth-hormone-gene-repeat) and MIPR (putative mollusca-insulin-like peptide-gene-repeat), and three microsatellites, RUBGT1 [containing (GT)n repeats], RUBCA1 [containing (CA)n repeats] and RUBGACA1 [containing (GACA)n repeats]. All three types of DNA markers revealed significant subdivision in the H. rubra populations along the coastline. This is postulated as being related to the abalone's relatively short pelagic period and limited dispersion. Further analysis revealed that a Point Cook population sampled from within the semi-enclosed Port Phillip Bay was distinct from two other central zone populations (Apollo Bay and Cape Schanck). The genotypes of microsatellites indicated excessive homozygotes across all the populations at all three microsatellite loci, and possible causes such as larval recruitment pattern and asynchronous spawning are discussed. The excessive homozygotes recorded for the three microsatellite loci contrast with those observed in the minisatellite loci GHR and MIPR, the heterozygosities of which were at Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium.

Keywords

Genetic Structure Microsatellite Marker Microsatellite Locus Central Zone Recruitment Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. X. Huang
    • 1
  • R. Peakall
    • 2
  • P. J. Hanna
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3217, Australia Fax: 0061 (0)3 5227-2022 e-mail: pjh@deakin.edu.auAU
  2. 2.Division of Botany and Zoology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, AustraliaAU

Personalised recommendations