Marine Biology

, Volume 132, Issue 4, pp 591–598 | Cite as

Fluoride in Antarctic marine crustaceans

  • M. Sands
  • S. Nicol
  • A. McMinn
Article

Abstract

The concentration of fluoride in the body parts of a range of Antarctic crustaceans from a variety of habits was examined with the aim of determining whether fluoride concentration is related to lifestyle or phylogenetic grouping. Euphausiids had the highest overall fluoride concentrations of a range of Antarctic marine crustaceans examined; levels of up to 5477 μg g−1 were found in the exoskeleton of Euphausia crystallorophias. Copepods had the lowest fluoride levels (0.87 μg g−1 whole-body); some amphipods and mysids also exhibited relatively high fluoride levels. There was no apparent relationship between the lifestyle of the crustaceans and their fluoride level; benthic and pelagic species exhibited both high and low fluoride levels. Fluoride was concentrated in the exoskeleton, but not evenly distributed through it; the exoskeleton of the head, carapace and abdomen contained the highest concentrations of fluoride, followed by the feeding basket and pleopods, and the eyes. The mouthparts of E.␣superba contained almost 13 000 μg F g−1 dry wt. Antarctic krill tail muscle had low levels of fluoride. After long-term (1 to 5 yr) storage in formalin, fluoride was almost completely lost from whole euphausiids.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Sands
    • 1
  • S. Nicol
    • 2
  • A. McMinn
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Antarctic and Southern Ocean Studies, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252C, Hobart 7001, Tasmania, AustraliaAU
  2. 2.Australian Antarctic Division, Channel Highway, Kingston 7050, Tasmania, Australia Fax: +61 (0) 362 323 351 e-mail: stephe-nic@antdiv.gov.auAU

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